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Hot Tub New Papers



.and a few older ones.

First, all of the following are available free at
http://www.pgi.gov.pl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2359&Itemid=
2 :

Jacobsen, A.R., and Bromley, R.G. 2009. New ichnotaxa based on tooth
impressions on dinosaur and whale bones; pp. 373-382 in Pieńkowski, G.,
Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Lockley, M.G. 2009. New perspectives on morphological variation in tridactyl
footprints: clues to widespread convergence in developmental dynamics pp.
415-432 in Pieńkowski, G., Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second
International Congress on Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Lockley, M.G., and Gierliński, G. 2009. A Grallator-dominated tracksite from
the Chinle Group (Late Triassic), Moab, Utah; pp. 433-440 in Pieńkowski, G.,
Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Ishigaki, S., and Matsumoto, M. 2009. Re-examination of manus-only and
manus-dominated sauropod trackways from Morocco; pp. 441-448 in Pieńkowski,
G., Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Ishigaki, S., Watabe, M., Tsogtbaatar, K., and Saneyoshi, M. 2009. Dinosaur
footprints from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia; pp. 449-460 in Pieńkowski,
G., Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Pieńkowski, G., Popa, M.E., and Kędzior, A. 2009. Early Jurassic sauropod
footprints of the Southern Carpathians, Romania: palaeobiological and
palaeogeographical significance; pp. 461-470 in Pieńkowski, G., Martin,
A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International Congress on Ichnology
(Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Gierliński, G., Lockley, M.G., and Niedźiedzki, G. 2009. A distinctive
crouching theropod trace from the Lower Jurassic of Poland; pp. 471-476 in
Pieńkowski, G., Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International
Congress on Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.

Gierliński, G., Menducki, P., Janiszewska, K., Wicik, I., and Boczarowski,
A. 2009. A preliminary report on dinosaur track assemblages from the Middle
Jurassic of the Imilchil area, Morocco; pp. 474-482 in Pieńkowski, G.,
Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (eds.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly 53.





Then, there are these:


Dingus, L., Garrido, A., Scott, G.R., Chiappe, L.M., Clarke, J., and
Schmitt, J.G. 2009. The litho-, bio- and magnetostratigraphy of
titanosaurian nesting sites in the Anacleto Formation at Auca Mahuevo
(Campanian, Neuquén Province, Argentina); pp. 237-258 in Albright, L.B.
(ed.), Papers on Geology, Vertebrate Paleontology, and Biostratigraphy in
Honor of Michael O. Woodburne. Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 65.





Rich, T., Vickers-Rich, P., Flannery, T.F., Pickering, D., Kool, L., Tait,
A.M., and Fitzgerald, E.M.G. 2009. A fourth Australian Mesozoic mammal
locality; pp. 677-681 in Albright, L.B. (ed.), Papers on Geology, Vertebrate
Paleontology, and Biostratigraphy in Honor of Michael O. Woodburne. Museum
of Northern Arizona Bulletin 65. 

ABSTRACT: A fourth Mesozoic mammal locality is now known from Australia, the
Eric the Red West locality. This late Aptian-early Albian site has produced
to date a single mandible fragment with a p6, m1 and trigonid of m2. As far
as can be determined, it is indistinguishable from Bishops whitmorei Rich et
al. (2001) from the early Aptian Flat Rocks locality.




Whiteside, J.H., Olsen, P.E., Eglinton, T., Brookfield, M.E., and Sambrotto,
R.N. 2010. Compound-specific carbon isotopes from Earth's largest flood
basalt eruptions directly linked to the end-Triassic mass extinction.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. doi:
10.1073/pnas.1001706107

ABSTRACT: A leading hypothesis explaining Phanerozoic mass extinctions and
associated carbon isotopic anomalies is the emission of greenhouse, other
gases, and aerosols caused by eruptions of continental flood basalt
provinces. However, the necessary serial relationship between these
eruptions, isotopic excursions, and extinctions has never been tested in
geological sections preserving all three records. The end-Triassic
extinction (ETE) at 201.4 Ma is among the largest of these extinctions and
is tied to a large negative carbon isotope excursion, reflecting
perturbations of the carbon cycle including a transient increase in CO2. The
cause of the ETE has been inferred to be the eruption of the giant Central
Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP). Here, we show that carbon isotopes of
leaf wax derived lipids (n-alkanes), wood, and total organic carbon from two
orbitally paced lacustrine sections interbedded with the CAMP in eastern
North America show similar excursions to those seen in the mostly marine St.
Audrie's Bay section in England. Based on these results, the ETE began
synchronously in marine and terrestrial environments slightly before the
oldest basalts in eastern North America but simultaneous with the eruption
of the oldest flows in Morocco, a CO2 super greenhouse, and marine
biocalcification crisis. Because the temporal relationship between CAMP
eruptions, mass extinction, and the carbon isotopic excursions are shown in
the same place, this is the strongest case for a volcanic cause of a mass
extinction to date. 





Le Loeuff, J., Métais, E., Dutheil, D.B., Rubino, J.L., Buffetaut, E.,
Lafont, F., Cavin, L., Moreau, F., Tong, H., Blanpied, C., and Sbeta, A.
2010. An Early Cretaceous vertebrate assemblage from the Cabao Formation of
NW Libya. Geological Magazine. doi: 10.1017/S0016756810000178.

ABSTRACT: Fossil vertebrates from the Cabao Formation discovered in the area
of Nalut in northwestern Libya include the hybodont shark Priohybodus, the
crocodilian Sarcosuchus, an abelisaurid, a baryonichine spinosaurid and a
large sauropod with spatulate teeth. The Cabao Formation may be Hauterivian
to Barremian in age, although an earlier Berriasian to Valanginian age
cannot be excluded. Its dinosaur assemblage is reminiscent of that of the El
Rhaz and Tiouraren formations of Niger and strongly differs from both the
Cenomanian assemblages of Morocco and Egypt and the Late Aptian to Albian
fauna of Tunisia. Fossil vertebrates may be an important tool to establish
the stratigraphical framework of the poorly dated Early Cretaceous
continental deposits of Africa.





Knoll, F. 2010. A primitive sauropodomorph from the upper Elliot Formation
of Lesotho. Geological Magazine. doi: 10.1017/S001675681000018X.

ABSTRACT: A well-preserved, articulated dinosaur skeleton from southern
Africa is described. The specimen comes from the upper Elliot Formation
(?Hettangian) of Ha Ralekoala (Lesotho) and represents a new species:
Ignavusaurus rachelis genus et species nova. A cladistic analysis suggests
that Ignavusaurus is more derived than Thecodontosaurus-Pantydraco, but more
primitive than Efraasia. Ignavusaurus indeed shares a number of unambiguous
synapomorphies with the taxa more derived than Thecodontosaurus-Pantydraco,
such as a fully open acetabulum, but it is more plesiomorphic than Efraasia
and more derived sauropodomorphs as shown by the evidence of, for instance,
the distal extremity of its tibia that is is longer (cranio-caudally) than
wide (latero-medially). The discovery of Ignavusaurus increases the known
diversity of the early sauropodomorph fauna of the upper Elliot Formation,
which stands as one of the richest horizons in the world in this respect.







~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jerry D. Harris
Director of Paleontology
Dixie State College
Science Building
225 South 700 East
St. George, UT  84770   USA
Phone: (435) 652-7758
Fax: (435) 656-4022
E-mail: jharris@dixie.edu
 and     dinogami@gmail.com
http://cactus.dixie.edu/jharris/


"I have noticed even people who
claim everything is predestined, and
that we can do nothing to change it,
look before they cross the road."

                   -- Stephen Hawking

"Prediction is very difficult,
especially of the future."

                   -- Niels Bohr