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RE: Science feather strength debate



Caudipteryx is the most basal example as far as I know, with Avimimus equally 
basal if we count its ulnar ridge as evidence for secondaries.  Beipiaosaurus 
preserves feathers along its ulna, but even if they're not taphonomically 
displaced, they're only stage 1.

Mickey Mortimer

----------------------------------------
> Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2010 13:56:38 -0500
> From: jaseb@amnh.org
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: RE: Science feather strength debate
>
>
> > I'm inclined to believe you. I know that the knobs aren't in quite the
> > same position on the ulna as they are in paraves. I think they're more
> > dorsal. Do you know of the most basal evidence for incipient wing
> > feathers? Is it all in maniraptora?
> >
> >
> >>
> >> Jason Brougham wrote-
> >>
> >>> Yes, of course it is not certain. But Conchavenator may have had
> >>> enlarged feathers on the ulna, and this might suggest that ulnar
> >>> feathers evolved no later than the last common ancestor between
> >>> carcharodontosaurs and birds lived. Of course it could be even earlier.
> >>> In any case, it is then quite possible that "wings" were serving some
> >>> function separate from climbing into trees.
> >>
> >> As Naish and I independantly concluded, the supposed feather quill knobs
> >> on Concavenator's ulna are probably an intermuscular line.
> >> http://theropoddatabase.blogspot.com/2010/09/concavenator-feathers-becklespinax-and.html
> >> http://theropoddatabase.blogspot.com/2010/09/concavenator-part-ii-becklespinax.html
> >>
> >> Mickey Mortimer
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > Jason Brougham
> > Senior Principal Preparator
> > Department of Exhibition
> > American Museum of Natural History
> > 81st Street at Central Park West
> > 212 496 3544
> > jaseb@amnh.org
> >
>
>
> Jason Brougham
> Senior Principal Preparator
> Department of Exhibition
> American Museum of Natural History
> 81st Street at Central Park West
> 212 496 3544
> jaseb@amnh.org
>