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RE: Lack of Running Giant Theropod Tracks



I  believe that the details are recorded in the Cambridge University
Dinosaur Tracks & Traces volume. (However, my copy is at work, so I can't
double check until Monday.)

>     To more or less get to the point, I remember watching 'Dinosaur
> Attack!' on the Discovery channel (back in 99 I think) in which Jim
> Farlow formed a hypothesis that the Paluxy trackway preserved a giant
> theropod attack. Part of the show revolved around the fact that one of
> the footprints is missing and that some (such as Bird) had speculated
> that it was because the Acro/allosaur latched onto the side of its
> victim. Farlow said that if that were the case there should be some
> extremely distorted footprints (I also think there would be some
> massive tail drag marks, especially considering the tail length of an
> allosaurid). Jim and his colleagues then went on to posit that it was
> likely a sort of skip or hop made in an attempt to keep pace or break
> into a run. If that were the case, it would mean both of the
> allosaurid's feet were off the ground at one point and that by
> extension would be strong evidence that giant theropods could achieve
> a fully arial phase in their stride (running). So even though we may
> not have trackway evidence of giant theropods actually in the act of
> running (for whatever reason) we *do* have possible evidence of a
> giant carnosaur skipping or hopping off of one leg. However, there is
> the possibility that the track is just simply missing as was already
> pointed out, but then I'm left wondering why it's simply missing; I'm
> guilty of begging the question if that is a likely explanation.
>
>
>   What I've been trying to find is a bird's eye view of the trackway so I
> can see how far the supposed skip/hop was. I'm thinking that if this
> animal could hop nearly an entire stride length on one leg it should
> have also been able to double or tripping its stride while running,
> which would put it somewhere between 20 and 30 mph (unless my math is
> way off).
>
>
>>>"do we have fossilized
>>> tracks that show ANY animal running, or breaking into a
>>> run?"
>
> I was under the impression that there is at least one case at Glen Rose,
> and another example that may be a "dino stampede"
>
>
> Sim Koning
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------
>> Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2010 00:43:20 -0800
>> From: erikboehm07@yahoo.com
>> To: dinosaur@usc.edu; pristichampsus@yahoo.com
>> Subject: Re: Lack of Running Giant Theropod Tracks
>>
>> Aren't there some trackways of humans running in Australia, that
>> supposedly show ancient shoeless aboriginees, on uneven ground, could
>> almost match the speed of Usain Bolt running in the Olympics?
>>
>> --- On Fri, 11/26/10, Jura wrote:
>>
>> > From: Jura
>> > Subject: Re: Lack of Running Giant Theropod Tracks
>> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>> > Date: Friday, November 26, 2010, 8:58 PM
>> > The first question that came to mind
>> > when I read this subject line was: "do we have fossilized
>> > tracks that show ANY animal running, or breaking into a
>> > run?"
>> >
>> > I honestly don't know, but that would be the first place I
>> > would look. If running trackways are rare (and I think they
>> > probably are) then they probably tell us more about the
>> > ecological conditions that preserve trackways (as Dr. Holtz
>> > alluded to) and less about the actual capabilities of the
>> > animals making them.
>> >
>> > Jason
>> >
>> >
>> > --- On Fri, 11/26/10, Sim Koning
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > > From: Sim Koning
>> > > Subject: Lack of Running Giant Theropod Tracks
>> > > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>> > > Date: Friday, November 26, 2010, 5:00 PM
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > Unless I missed a major discovery somewhere, we
>> > have
>> > > yet to find a trackway that proves that giant
>> > theropods
>> > > could run. What about the Paluxy River
>> > > Acrocanthosaur/allosaurid trackway that is "missing"
>> > a
>> > > footprint on one side? It is ulikely that the Acro
>> > was
>> > > hanging onto the side of the sauropod, since there is
>> > no
>> > > change in the sauropod's gate, and there is no
>> > distortion in
>> > > the "hopping" print as one might expect. If the
>> > > Acrocanthosaur (or similar allosauroid) was "skipping"
>> > to
>> > > keep pace, that would mean this huge animal hopped on
>> > one
>> > > foot (both feet were in the air at one point). Doesn't
>> > this
>> > > trackway then demonstrate that at least this theropod
>> > had
>> > > leg muscles strong enough to propel it into an arial
>> > phase
>> > > in its stride and was therefore capable of running?
>> > How long
>> > > was the hop le
>> Couldn't you use the "hop" length
>> > to
>> > > calculate the force needed to propel a 4 to 6 tonne
>> > animal
>> > > through the air (on one foot) for that distance and
>> > then use
>> > > that data to help calculate potential run speed? I'm
>> > sorry
>> > > if this has been brought up already. I checked the
>> > list and
>> > > couldn't find much on this subject beyond paper
>> > requests.
>> > >
>> > > Simeon Koning
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> > >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>