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Fwd: juveniles faster than adults.



Information about juvenile animals that are indeed faster than adults
(which of course invalidates my hypothesis that adults are essentially
always faster than juveniles).  Forwarded with permission from Peggy,
who reads the DML archives but isn't a subscriber.



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: peggy richter <kuymal1@verizon.net>
Date: 30 November 2010 19:17
Subject: Re: juveniles faster than adults.
To: Mike Taylor <mike@indexdata.com>


thank you.  I don't subscribe to DML -- I just read the posts on the
web (I have for several years now).  I'm afraid that I'd be tempted to
post when I'm really pretty ignorant (although very interested) about
dinosaurs.
Average size dogs are fully mature at about 4/5.  Up until that point,
at least with the more "wolf like" dogs, there is still growth and
development going on.  You get broader chests, thicker coats, etc.  In
herding, the best years of a dog are usually 5-10.  That's when one
has the "perfect" combination of physical maturity and mental
skills/training. In practical cow work, the average cow dog maybe
lasts until it's 5-6 because they get kicked.  But it's the older (and
smarter and more skilled dogs, even if they are slower) that are the
most prized.  But it's the young dogs that are clearly faster.
National Geographic had a special on not long ago "rise of black wolf"
about a specific male in Yellowstone.  As they noted, this wolf lived
to an unusual 11 years in the wild but was the pack leader at the time
of his death. While slower than the younger wolves of his pack, he had
the skills, knowledge and size to bring down the prey that the younger
members wore out.

Dogs can breed as young as 6 months when they clearly aren't
physically mature in skeletal areas.  That's probably selection from
domestication. Wolves are usually 1, or more often 2, but they still
are "adolescents" at that age.  A 2 year old pack leader would be a
very unusual occurrence.

Peggy Richter, Kuymal Belgians kuymal1@verizon.net http://www.kuymal.com/
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety" - Benjamin Franklin
-----Original Message----- From: Mike Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2010 10:40 AM
To: peggy richter
Subject: Re: juveniles faster than adults.

Excellent, thanks for that!  You should post it to the DML -- others
will also be interested.

But aren't the four- and five-year-old dogs adults?


On 30 November 2010 17:25, peggy richter <kuymal1@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> sorry to bug you.  I read the DML and you posted:
> Do we know of any extant animals in which the juveniles can run faster than
> the adults?
> =yes. Wolves.  Dogs like greyhounds are at their fastest at about 2-4. This
> is why racing greyhounds are retired at fairly young ages.  In herding,
> young dogs are faster, the older dogs (4&5 or older) have more "savy" in
> managing the livestock.  Female lions and juvenile male lions are faster
> than the pride leader mature adult males.    Most race horses are pretty
> young and retired before they are 5.  I think there are some studies on
> people that show teenage boys are faster than adults (hence the general
> young age at the Olympics).
>
> Peggy Richter, Kuymal Belgians kuymal1@verizon.net http://www.kuymal.com/
> "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety
> deserve neither liberty nor safety" - Benjamin Franklin
>
>