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RE: New paper on pre-Archaeopteryx coelurosaurian dinosaurs





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> Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2010 14:49:12 -0400
> From: hmwh@comcast.net
> To: bh480@scn.org; dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: New paper on pre-Archaeopteryx coelurosaurian dinosaurs
>
> And another thing...
>
> "So if evolution is true, how come we still have monkeys?"
 
"Some of them were given a choice."  -B.C. comic strip.
 
 
> (That imbecile
> running for office out east who is not a witch.)
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: 
> To: 
> Sent: Tuesday, October 26, 2010 5:35 AM
> Subject: New paper on pre-Archaeopteryx coelurosaurian dinosaurs
>
>
> > From: Ben Creisler
> > bh480@scn.org
> >
> > In case this new paper has not been mentioned:
> >
> > Xing Xu, QingYu Ma and DongYu Hu (2010)
> > Pre-Archaeopteryx coelurosaurian dinosaurs and their
> > implications for understanding avian origins.
> > Chinese Science Bulletin (advance online publication)
> > DOI: 10.1007/s11434-010-4150-z
> >
> > The last two decades have witnessed great advances in
> > reconstructing the transition from non-avian theropods to
> > avians, but views in opposition to the theropod
> > hypothesis still exist. Here we highlight one issue that
> > is often considered to raise problems for the theropod
> > hypothesis of avian origins, i.e. the "temporal paradox"
> > in the stratigraphic distribution of theropod fossils -
> > the idea that the earliest known avian is from the Late
> > Jurassic but most other coelurosaurian groups are poorly
> > known in the Jurassic, implying that avians arose before
> > their supposed ancestors. However, a number of Jurassic
> > non-avian coelurosaurian theropods have recently been
> > discovered, thus documenting the presence of most of the
> > major coelurosaurian groups in the Jurassic alongside, or
> > prior to, avians. These discoveries have greatly improved
> > the congruence between stratigraphy and phylogeny for
> > derived theropods and, effectively, they reject
> > the "temporal paradox" concept. Most importantly, these
> > discoveries provide significant new information that
> > supports the relatively basal positions of the
> > Tyrannosauroidea and Alvarezsauroidea among the
> > Coelurosauria. Indeed, they imply a new phylogenetic
> > hypothesis for the interrelationships of Paraves, in
> > which Archaeopteryx, the Dromaeosauridae, and the
> > Troodontidae form a monophyletic group while the
> > Scansoriopterygidae, other basal birds, and probably also
> > the Oviraptorosauria, form another clade. Mapping some of
> > the salient features onto a temporally-calibrated
> > theropod phylogeny indicates that characteristics related
> > to flight and arboreality evolved at the base of the
> > Paraves, earlier than the Late Jurassic.
> >
> >
> > http://www.springerlink.com/content/387524025j71h741/
> >
> >
> > Also now available for free at:
> > http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/handle/2246/6087
> >
> > Daniel T. Ksepka and Mark A. Norell, 2010.
> > The Illusory Evidence for Asian Brachiosauridae: New
> > Material of Erketu ellisoni and a Phylogenetic
> > Reappraisal of Basal Titanosauriformes
> > American Museum Novitates 3700: 1-27
> >
> >
>