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Fwd: dino-lizers



> Either dino or pterosaur, yes. It contained the skeletons of four 
> enatiornithine juveniles.
> 
> They comment that the amount of acid etching is less than in crocodilians.
> 
> Palaeontology: An Early Cretaceous pelletJosé L. Sanz1, Luis M. Chiappe2, 
> Yolanda Fernádez-Jalvo3, Francisco Ortega1, Begoña Sánchez-Chillón3, 
> Francisco J. Poyato-Ariza1 & Bernardino P. Pérez-Moreno1, Nature 409, 
> 998-1000 (22 February 2001) | doi:10.1038/35059172 
> 
> 
> On Apr 21, 2011, at 11:00 AM, Richard W. Travsky wrote:
> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Tue, 19 Apr 2011, Don Ohmes wrote:
>>> On 4/19/2011 1:16 PM, Jason Brougham wrote:
>>>> ...
>>>> Are modern crocodilians definitely primarily scavengers? We've all seen 
>>>> the youtube videos where they engage in ambush predation on large animals. 
>>>> Cretaceous crocodilians were more diverse and could have included more 
>>>> active predators.
>>> 
>>> The argument is not that crocs are scavengers -- the argument is that a 
>>> critter that eats a lot of bone evolves very strong acids -- hence, the 
>>> presence of bone preserved in the gut indicates that bone was not very 
>>> important as a dietary component, which seems unlikely in a scavenger.
>> 
>> Like hyenas. What other mammals have strong stomach acid? My dog eats bones 
>> (ribs, pork chops) but chews and grinds them.
>> 
>> There's bird pellets... any dino pellets been found?
> 
> Jason Brougham
> Senior Principal Preparator
> American Museum of Natural History
> jaseb@amnh.org
> (212) 496 3544
> 
> 

Jason Brougham
Senior Principal Preparator
American Museum of Natural History
jaseb@amnh.org
(212) 496 3544