[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: Ah ha! That's where therizinosaurs came from



Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com> wrote:

>   I have a hard time seeing sapeornithids (any of them) as oviraptorsaurs. 
> The skulls (e.g., Zhou & Zhang, 2003) are superifically similar (and by 
> superficially, I mean cherry-picking specific oviraptorosaurs and ignoring 
> others, like for example *Incisivosaurus gauthieri*) but seem to differ in 
> the details, or are represented broadly among maniraptorans, like 
> *Scansoriopteryx heilmanni* (Czerkas & Yuan, 2002) and *Epidexipteryx hui* 
> (Zhang et al. 2008).

Andrea Cau has proposed a clade (named "Magnoviraptorosauria")
containing not only oviraptorosaurs and sapeornithids, but
scansoriopterygids as well. Given that Xu et al. (2010) supported a
sister group relationship between scansoriopterygids and
oviraptorosaurs to the exclusion of sapeornithids and Paul (2010)
argued for a link between oviraptorosaurs and sapeornithids (with
scansoriopterygids as _Coelurosauria_ incertae sedis), it may be or
become the best explanation for the problem. The distribution of skull
characters you mention seems to support it.


References:

http://theropoda.blogspot.com/2010/06/coming-soon-flying-oviraptorosaurs-from.html

http://theropoda.blogspot.com/2010/06/test-su-magnoviraptorosauria.html

Paul GS 2010 The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs. Princeton:
Princeton Univ Press. 320 p

Xu X, Ma Q-Y, Hu D-Y 2010 Pre-_Archaeopteryx_ coelurosaurian dinosaurs
and their implications for understanding avian origins. Chin Sci Bull
55: 1-7
-- 
David Černý