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RE: Meet Triceratops



What Heinrich is getting at is that there is an extent of cartilage around the 
epiphyses that is to some extent _under_ emphasized in modern reconstructions, 
although some artists (*cough* not me *cough*) take extra care to try to 
-accurately_ represent this size increase. In sauropods, for example, the 
amount of cartilage in the limbs and potentially in the vertebrae could have 
been relatively high, while in smaller animals and avian-stem theropods, likely 
quite small (depending...). Increasing the cartilage in ceratopsians may alter 
the active range of motion and the degree of forelimb sprawl while still 
fitting the limbs into the prints.

Cheers,

  Jaime A. Headden
  The Bite Stuff (site v2)
  http://qilong.wordpress.com/

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
Backs)


----------------------------------------
> Date: Wed, 31 Aug 2011 12:56:48 -0700
> From: turtlecroc@yahoo.com
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu; heinrich.mallison@googlemail.com
> Subject: Re: Meet Triceratops
>
> > I see, people still follow the "push the bones so they touch"
> > doctrine. get real.
>
> Eh..? Not sure what you're trying to say. The articular
> surfaces of ceratopsian long bones were covered with
> cartilage that defined a more precise range of motion for
> the joint, i.e. than you would presume looking only at the
> fossilized bones. Skeletons shouldn't be (and never are,
> I hope) mounted with humerus and radius/ulna in contact.
>
>
> --- On Wed, 8/31/11, Heinrich Mallison <heinrich.mallison@googlemail.com> 
> wrote:
>
> > From: Heinrich Mallison <heinrich.mallison@googlemail.com>
> > Subject: Re: Meet Triceratops
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Date: Wednesday, August 31, 2011, 2:28 PM
> >
> > I see, people still follow the "push the bones so they touch"
> > doctrine. get real.
> >
> > Heinrich
> >
> > On Wed, Aug 31, 2011 at 9:02 PM, Paul P <turtlecroc@yahoo.com>
> > wrote:
> > >> Am I seeing idiotically everted elbows there?
> > >
> > > No... you are seeing properly everted elbows, if by
> > everted
> > > you mean a semi-sprawling gait. The rostral view (at
> > the
> > > top of the page) looks quite good anatomically.
> > Semi-erect
> > > forelimbs just as they should be. Now as for the
> > apparently
> > > keratinous face, that is another matter.
> > >
> > >    Paul P.
> > >
> > > --- On Tue, 8/30/11, Heinrich Mallison <heinrich.mallison@googlemail.com>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > >> From: Heinrich Mallison <heinrich.mallison@googlemail.com>
> > >> Subject: Re: Meet Triceratops
> > >> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > >> Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2011, 8:58 PM
> > >>
> > >> Am I seeing idiotically everted elbows there?
> > >>
> > >> Sheesh, folks, this is TV, so it was run by
> > scientists
> > >> BEFORE all the
> > >> important decisions were made, so it sucks.
> > >>
> > >> any question?
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> turn on your brains, read the papers. There's your
> > answer.
> > >>
> > >> (stomps off in frustration)
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> On Wed, Aug 31, 2011 at 3:44 AM,  <Danvarner@aol.com>
> > wrote:
> > >> > Go to Pete Von Sholly's blog  (at your
> > peril!) and
> > >> scroll down to a frame
> > >> > of Dave Krentz's Triceratops from
> >  "Dinosa
> day. Incredible. Click to enlarge. V  V
> > >> >
> > >> > http://vonshollywood.blogspot.com/
> > >> >
> > >> >
> > >>
> > >
> >