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RE: The best formations for fossilizing Tyrannosaurids in?



Guanlong, Dilong and Tanycolagreus are there too, just listed as coelurosaurs 
closer to birds than tyrannosauroids.  The position of these taxa (and 
Coelurus, Eotyrannus, Proceratosaurus, Kileskus, Mirischia and 
Sinocalliopteryx) is uncertain, as preliminary studies suggest only a few steps 
are needed to switch their place from basal tyrannosauroids to slightly more 
closely related to birds than tyrannosauroids.  For instance, Lee and Worthy's 
(2011) liklihood analysis of Xu et al.'s (2011) coelurosaur dataset found 
Eotyrannus, Dilong, Tanycolagreus and Coelurus to not be tyrannosauroids.

Mickey Mortimer

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> Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2011 08:34:25 +0000
> From: keenir@hotmail.com
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: RE: The best formations for fossilizing Tyrannosaurids in?
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------
> > Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2011 00:14:17 -0800
> > From: mickey_mortimer111@msn.com
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: RE: The best formations for fossilizing Tyrannosaurids in?
>
> thank you
>
> > Check out my website 
> > http://home.comcast.net/~eoraptor/Phylogeny%20of%20Taxa.html for the 
> > answers. The exception is Gorgosaurus and Albertosaurus,
>
> and three others. (Guanlong, Dilong, Tanycolagreus; but nobody's perfect)
>
>
> that said, I appreciate the help you gave. (and the prompt response)
>
>
> > which have incomplete entries. For Albertosaurus, Tanke and Currie (2010) 
> > detail the remains, which are all from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of 
> > Alberta. For Gorgosaurus, most are from the Dinosaur Park Formation of the 
> > Judith River Group. There are probably fragmentary specimens referred to 
> > Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus from other formations, but I'm not sure of 
> > their validity.
> >
> > Tanke and Currie, 2010. A history of Albertosaurus discoveries in Alberta, 
> > Canada. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 47, 1197-1211.
> >
> > Mickey Mortimer
> >
> > ----------------------------------------
> > > Date: Sun, 4 Dec 2011 02:43:08 +0000
> > > From: keenir@hotmail.com
> > > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > > Subject: The best formations for fossilizing Tyrannosaurids in?
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > I was reading _Feathered Dinosaurs_ by J.Long and P.Schouten, and I 
> > > noticed that only some of the Tyrannosauroids mentioned a formation they 
> > > hail from.
> > >
> > > Which got me curious, so I thought I'd ask the experts:
> > >
> > > Which formations have given us the best/most complete fossils of each 
> > > genera?
> > >
> > >
> > > _Tanycolagreus topwilsoni_ (?Tyrannosaurid?), Late Jurassic Morrison 
> > > Formation, 4 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Dilong paradoxus_, Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation, 1.6 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Guanlong wucai_, Late Jurassic, 3 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Alioramus remotus_, Late Cretaceous, 6 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Alectrosaurus olseni_, Late Cretaceous Iren Dabasu Formation & 
> > > Bayanshiree Svita (Omnogov), 5 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis_, Late Cretaceous, 7 meter long 
> > > juvinile.
> > >
> > > _Tarbosaurus bataar_, Late Cretaceous, 14 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Tyrannosaurus rex_, Late Cretaceous, 12.5 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Daspletosaurus torosus_, Late Cretaceous, 9 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Albertosaurus sarcophagus_, Late Cretaceous, 9 meters long.
> > >
> > > _Gorgosaurus libratus_, Late Cretaceous, 9 meters long.
> > >
> > >
> > > thank you.
> > >
> > >
> >