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RE: Sinosauropteryx feather paper (free pdf)



  It was my first thought as well. I wonder if a better version is available.

Cheers,

  Jaime A. Headden
  The Bite Stuff (site v2)
  http://qilong.wordpress.com/

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
Backs)


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> Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2011 11:42:49 -0800
> From: pristichampsus@yahoo.com
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Sinosauropteryx feather paper (free pdf)
>
> Why is the image quality so terrible in this paper? Did Lingham-Soliar not 
> have higher quality images, or did the Journal of Ornithology downsample 
> everything? It's too bad as the poor image quality makes it much harder to 
> see what is being talked about.
>
> Jason
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> > From: Ben Creisler <bscreisler@yahoo.com>
> > To: "dinosaur@usc.edu" <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> > Cc:
> > Sent: Monday, 5 December 2011 11:43 AM
> > Subject: Sinosauropteryx feather paper (free pdf)
> >
> > From: Ben Creisler
> > bscreisler@yahoo.com
> >
> > A new paper--the pdf is free for now.
> >
> > Theagarten Lingham-Soliar ("2011")
> > The evolution of the feather: Sinosauropteryx, life, death and preservation 
> > of
> > an alleged feathered dinosaur.
> > Journal of Ornithology (advance online publication)
> > DOI: 10.1007/s10336-011-0787-x
> > http://www.springerlink.com/content/0383285508u76214/
> > free pdf:  http://www.springerlink.com/content/0383285508u76214/fulltext.pdf
> >
> > Among the spectacular dinosaur fossils reported from the Jehol Group of
> > northeastern China is the most celebrated, Sinosauropteryx, which continues 
> > to
> > excite interest in questions concerning feather origins--most recently with
> > alleged identifications of melanosomes and colour in its integumental
> > structures, which proved unfounded. The crucial significance of 
> > Sinosauropteryx
> > is undoubtedly the focus on its basal theropod status and potentially 
> > pivotal
> > position in informing models of the early evolutionary origin of modern
> > feathers. On the basis of new evidence in Sinosauropteryx NIGP 127587 and 
> > GMV
> > 2124, it is shown here that the alleged protofeathers were not free 
> > filaments
> > but part of a composite tissue. It is shown that the tail terminates in a
> > unique, smoothly edged, spatula-shaped structure. The dinosaurs died in the
> > vicinity of a lake. For the first time, the taphonomy of Sinosauropteryx is
> > investigated on the basis of aboveground decomposition
> > experiments on living animals so as to get a better understanding of 
> > conditions
> > pre
> s death, decomposition and finally
> > preservation of soft tissue as manifested in the fossil. The signs point
> > strongly to invertebrate colonization of the carcass of Sinosauropteryx 
> > rather
> > than vertebrate predation or scavenging, with moderate decay associated 
> > with the
> > purge fluids while major decay was forestalled by burial, at most a few days
> > after death. Lastly, a theory that the opisthotonic posture of fossils such 
> > as
> > Sinosauropteryx NIGP 127587 occurred perimortem as a consequence of neural
> > spasms provides the basis for a forensic reconstruction of the stages 
> > leading to
> > the dinosaur’s death and the final preserved position of the external, 
> > dorsally
> > preserved soft tissue, which proves to be more consistent with a uniform 
> > crest
> > than individual, free protofeathers.
> >