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Re: Bird embryo wing digits are 1, 2, 3



From: Ben Creisler
bh480@scn.org

There is a less technical discussion of the research at:
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/02/dinos-gave-
birds-the-finger.html?ref=hp

Dinos Gave Birds the Finger

> I quite don't get an idea of what they're talking 
about...(plus the 
> paper is not free-access)
> Does this refute digit shift theory?
> Cheers,
> Jean-Michel
> 
> Le 10/02/2011 12:04, bh480@scn.org a écrit :
> > From: Ben Creisler
> > bh480@scn.org
> >
> > In case this new paper in Science has not been 
mentioned
> > yet:
> >
> > Koji Tamura, Naoki Nomura, Ryohei Seki, Sayuri Yonei-
> > Tamura, and Hitoshi Yokoyama (2011)
> > Embryological Evidence Identifies Wing Digits in 
Birds as
> > Digits 1, 2, and 3.
> > Science 331(6018): 753-757 (11 February 2011)
> > DOI: 10.1126/science.1198229
> > <a 
href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/331/6018/753.abstr
act">http://www.sciencemag.org/content/331/6018/753.abstra
ct</a>
> >
> > Abstract
> > The identities of the digits of the avian forelimb are
> > disputed. Whereas paleontological findings support the
> > position that the digits correspond to digits one, 
two,
> > and three, embryological evidence points to digit two,
> > three, and four identities. By using transplantation 
and
> > cell-labeling experiments, we found that the
> > posteriormost digit in the wing does not correspond to
> > digit four in the hindlimb; its progenitor segregates
> > early from the zone of polarizing activity, placing 
it in
> > the domain of digit three specification. We suggest 
that
> > an avian-specific shift uncouples the digit anlagen 
from
> > the molecular mechanisms that pattern them, resulting 
in
> > the imposition of digit one, two, and three 
identities on
> > the second, third, and fourth anlagens.
> >
> >
> >
>