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RE: Terminology question.



But would the word paleopathology apply to it, in that case?

~ Saint Abyssal

--- On Fri, 7/15/11, Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com> wrote:

> From: Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com>
> Subject: RE: Terminology question.
> To: saint_abyssal@yahoo.com, "Dinosaur Mailing List" <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> Date: Friday, July 15, 2011, 8:19 PM
> 
>   The most conservative argument is that the tooth mark
> occurred in or around death, before burial. We cannot
> presume the mark was made from scavenging, although the
> frequency of it may, such as if there were multiple
> different directions of mark, or many marks, but not
> necessarily parallel.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
>   Jaime A. Headden
>   The Bite Stuff (site v2)
>   http://qilong.wordpress.com/
> 
> "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B.
> Medawar (1969)
> 
> 
> "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with
> a
> different language and a new way of looking at things, the
> human race
> has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his
> language or
> his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan
> (Beast With a Billion Backs)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------
> > Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2011 08:49:51 -0700
> > From: saint_abyssal@yahoo.com
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: Terminology question.
> >
> > If there's a theropod toothmark on a dinosaur bone and
> there's no sign of healing, but also no compelling reason to
> believe the bone was marked during scavenging, would that
> toothmark be considered a paleopathology? Would it just be
> assumed out of conservatism to be due to scavenging even in
> the absence of positive evidence for it just because there
> wasn't any evidence to support the idea that the mark was
> received while the subject was alive? Or, would it fall into
> a grey zone of "we're not sure whether this is a
> paleopathology or not". Basically I'm confused about the
> exact way that the term paleopathology is used when dealing
> with evidence for damage to bone that one can't be certain
> whether or happened before or after death. Could anyone help
> me out?
> >
> > ~ Abyssal
>     
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