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Ceratopsian horn core and Deinosuchus from Mexico (free pdfs)



From: Ben Creisler
bh480@scn.org


Two papers in press for Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas now
available as free pdfs:
http://rmcg.geociencias.unam.mx/revista/mrevista.php?idioma=E&numero=X

Héctor Gerardo Porras-Muzquiz and Thomas M. Lehman (2011)
A ceratopsian horncore from the Olmos Formation (Early Maastrichtian) near
Múzquiz, Mexico. 
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas 28 (2): 262-266 (in press)
http://rmcg.unam.mx/en_prensa/(07)Porras.pdf

ABSTRACT
An isolated supraorbital horncore collected from the Olmos Formation near
Múzquiz is among the longest ever found, and records the presence in this
area of a very large ceratopsid. The specimen probably pertains to a
chasmosaurine, but differs signifi  cantly from the horncores in
Coahuilaceratops known from the nearby Cerro del Pueblo Formation, and
cannot be attributed with confi  dence to any other known ceratopsid.


Many thanks to Ruben Guzman for bringing this pdf (now available) to my
attention.

Héctor E. Rivera-Sylva, Eberhard Frey, José Rubén Guzmán-Gutiérrez,
Francisco Palomino-Sánchez, and Wolfgang Stinnesbeck (2011)
A Deinosuchus riograndensis (Eusuchia: Alligatoroidea) from Coahuila, North
Mexico. 
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas 28 (2): 267-274 (in press)
http://rmcg.unam.mx/en_prensa/(08)RiveraSylva.pdf

ABSTRACT
Diagnostic remains of Deinosuchus have been discovered in the Aguja
Formation (Late Cretaceous, Late Campanian) near the town of La Salada
(northwestern Coahuila, Mexico) and are described here for the first
time. The material comprises six teeth and tooth fragments that were found
associated with postcranial material such as two osteoderms and a cervical
and caudal vertebra and is referred here to D. riograndensis. The
association with a variety of herbivorous dinosaurs and trionychid turtles
suggest a predator-prey interaction, which is confirmed by the
occurrence of a vertebra with a Deinosuchus bite mark. The Deinosuchus
remains from La Salada represent the southern-most occurrence of the genus
known to date.





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