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FW: GSP statement on use of my dinosaur restorations (follow up)







Cheers,

Jaime A. Headden
The Bite Stuff (site v2)
http://qilong.wordpress.com/

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
Backs)





----------------------------------------
> From: qi_leong@hotmail.com
> To: vrtpaleo@usc.edu
> Subject: RE: GSP statement on use of my dinosaur restorations (follow up)
> Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2011 01:50:44 -0700
>
>
> I'd like to second Mike's comments. As a skeletal artist who has also been 
> published, although not to the extent of artists like Paul, Abraczinkas, 
> Hartman, or Hallett on this matter, I have endowed my work with the freedom 
> to be used in scientific discourse, without restriction aside from lack of 
> modification and with required attribution. I hold a Creative Commons license 
> on them, and this is declared therein. I also vary my skeletal postures a 
> fair amount, and prefer a flexible posture (especially as some popular 
> Paul-like postures tend to obscure features (maniraptorans restored with 
> hyperflexed limbs covering regions of the spine and ribs, or hips when the 
> limbs are long enough, etc.)).
>
> http://qilong.deviantart.com/gallery/5004771#/d26ztox
>
> Above is an example of a posture I like that is both artistic and gives much 
> room for adaptive figuring (Sereno-Abraczinkas style) as well as reposturing 
> (just clip out the limbs and move them as needed -- most of my skeletals are 
> preserved in large file formats and multiple layers).
>
> ---
>
> On another note, I would like to know why *Kryzanowskisaurus* 
> (*Kryzanowskisaurus hunti* {Heckert, 2002}) is in scare quotes; as the ref 
> below describes, it was validly named. Being a synonym should not dismiss 
> validity: *Brontosaurus* certainly rarely gets scare quotes.
>
> Heckert, A. B., 2005. *Krzyzanowskisaurus*, a new name for a probable 
> ornithischian dinosaur from the Upper Triassic Chinle Group, Arizona and New 
> Mexico, USA. _New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin_ 
> 29:77-83.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Jaime A. Headden
> The Bite Stuff (site v2)
> http://qilong.wordpress.com/
>
> "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)
>
>
> "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
> different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
> has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
> his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
> Backs)
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------
> > Date: Tue, 8 Mar 2011 08:07:14 +0000
> > From: mike@indexdata.com
> > To: GSP1954@aol.com
> > CC: vrtpaleo@usc.edu; dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: Re: GSP statement on use of my dinosaur restorations (follow up)
> >
> > On 7 March 2011 16:18, wrote:
> > > The basic rule needs to be that that an artist produce their own skeletal
> > > restoration based on original research. This would include using photos of
> > > the skeleton, or an illustrated technical paper on the particular taxon. 
> > > This
> > > then goes into your files as documentation of originality, and you can
> > > publish it.
> >
> > Some interesting stuff here, Greg, and I certainly understand your
> > frustration at the way your style, which 20 years ago was unique, has
> > increased its influence to the point where it's one of the standard
> > styles of palaeoart. I am sure Charles Knight felt much the same.
> >
> > Still, I'm not sure I see why it should be unreasonable for other
> > artists to use your reconstructions as a basis for their restorations.
> > (Note: basis. I am certainly not advocating the kind of wholesale
> > ripping off that gave rise to the "Krzyzanowskisaurus"
> > reconstruction.) Would you, in the same way, advocate that
> > palaeoartists making skeletal reconstructions should go and take their
> > own photographs of the bones, rather than re-using those taken by
> > other scientists and prepared as figures?
> >
> > To pick a topical example, if for some reason you wanted to
> > reconstruct Brontomerus, would you feel obliged to take your own
> > photographs of the ilium, scapula, etc. rather than using those at
> > http://www.miketaylor.org.uk/dino/brontomerus/extras.html
> > ? Of, if you feel the manipulated photographs should be exempt, then
> > what about using prepared artwork of individual elements such as those
> > of the Argentinosaurus vertebrae in Bonaparte and Coria (1993), as
> > shown at
> > http://svpow.wordpress.com/2008/01/08/the-revenge-of-the-controversial-hypantra-of-argentinosaurus/
> > Should these also be unavailable for palaeoartists to use without
> > explicit permission or payment? If not, could you explain what the
> > difference is?
> >
> > > Do not pose it in my classic left foot pushing off in a high velocity
> > > posture. Not because I am inherently outraged -- it would be rather nice 
> > > if not
> > > for some practical issues. For one thing I have succeeded in getting some 
> > > big
> > > payments for unauthorized use of this pose by major prjects that should
> > > have known better. Aside from the financial issue, there are other 
> > > concerns if
> > > you think about it. It is widely assumed that any skeleton in this pose is
> > > mine, but what if it does not meet my level of accuracy? The trust in and
> > > value of my work is degraded. There are gigillions of poses a skeleton 
> > > can be
> > > placed in. Be original.
> >
> > I have to say this seems pretty outrageous -- the idea that a
> > particular pose can be someone's intellectual property would seem
> > laughable if it wasn't so serious. Or did I misunderstand and is this
> > part a joke? If not, then I have to say it's enormously useful to be
> > able to directly compare, for example, Scott Hartman's reconstructions
> > at
> > http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/
> > directly with yours, seeing the differences in interpretation clearly
> > because of the adoption of Greg Paul Normal Pose. I'd hate to lose
> > that ability against the possibility that someone might wrongly think
> > one of Scott's pieces was yours. After all, the goal of skeletal
> > reconstructions (as opposed to life restorations) is primary to be
> > scientifically useful, right?
> >
> > -- Mike.
>