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Re: Mesozoic mammals - trees or ground



"Do most of the known Mesozoic mammals exhibit evidence of their living in trees, on the ground...or is it like with Archie, and the evidence could be interpretted either way?"

Definitely yes, no and perhaps. Keeping in mind skeletons aren't exactly common, Mongolian Upper Cretaceous multituberculates tend to be seen as terrestrial, as is the case for a "symmetrodont" called /Zhangheotherium/ from Liaoning. /Haldanodon/ -an Upper Jurassic docodont from Portugal, got accused of desmane-like interests in burrowing and swimming, tastes then more spectacularly demonstrated by its earlier relative /Castorocauda/. And various mammals have been accused of having arboreal, or at least clambering interests: eg. /Henkelotherium/, /Eomaia/ and /Sinodelphys/.

A complicating factor is, should you have a head-body length of say ten centimetres, clambering skills are liable to be helpful when travelling across a bit of ground humans stupidly think of as being flat. Also, of course, as many taxa are based upon isolated teeth or even some teeth on a small bit of jaw bone, then evidence of relevance for such matters is slightly less then minimal.
Cheers
Trevor Dykes

On 31.10.2011 23:37, Anthony Docimo wrote:

Do most of the known Mesozoic mammals exhibit evidence of their living in 
trees, on the ground...or is it like with Archie, and the evidence could be 
interpretted either way?


(_Volatacotherium_'s a definate tree-dweller, I know; _Repomanus_(sp) seems too 
bulky to be very good at climbing)