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Re: Microraptor ate birds



**sent this in direct reply to  Ben Creisler first, resending now**


I've gotta say that that was a pretty darned cool poster at SVP this
year. At first it really seemed like good support for Microraptor
being arboreal, BUT, then I remembered that my cat would eat
passerines all the time, and my cat isn't arboreal (at least not like
we usually mean when we think of arboreal maniraptors).



ALSO, isn't it pretty darned cool that the Economist has dinosaur
articles, i mean, you'd never see an economic article in a science
journal, just shows how awesome science is that even 'money people'
are like "ZOMG DINOSAURS!"

> On Thu, Nov 10, 2011 at 1:30 PM, bh480@scn.org <bh480@scn.org> wrote:
>> From: Ben Creisler
>> bh480@scn.org
>>
>> Another news article about the SVP meeting, this time about Microraptor:
>>
>> What dinosaurs ate--The belly of the beast
>> http://www.economist.com/node/21538077
>>
>>
>> SVP Abstract 2011
>>
>> O’CONNOR, Jingmai, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and
>> Paleoanthropology, Beijing, China; ZHOU, Zhonghe, Institute of Vertebrate
>> Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing, China; XU, Xing, Institute of
>> Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing, China
>>
>> SMALL THEROPOD WITH BIRD IN STOMACH INDICATES BOTH LIVED IN TREES
>>
>> Preserved indicators of diet are extremely rare in the fossil record; even
>> more so is unequivocal direct evidence for predator-prey relationships.
>> Here, we report on a new specimen of the small non-avian theropod
>> Microraptor from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, China that has the
>> remains of an adult enantiornithine bird in its stomach. The new specimen
>> helps to further reconstruct the dietary preferences of Microraptor.
>> Furthermore, because Jehol enantiornithines were distinctly arboreal, in
>> contrast to their ornithurine counterparts which were cursorial, this
>> fossil suggests that Microraptor hunted in trees and strongly supports
>> inferences that this taxon was also an arborealist. This discovery provides
>> further support for the arboreality of basal dromaeosaurs and a 'trees
>> down' origin for bird flight.
>>
>>
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>
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>
> --
> Robert J. Schenck
> Kingsborough Community College
> Physical Sciences Department
> S332 ph# 718-368-5792
> Follow Me on Twitter: @Schenck
> KCC Class Schedule on Google Calendar: http://tinyurl.com/mqwlcy
>



-- 
Robert J. Schenck
Kingsborough Community College
Physical Sciences Department
S332 ph# 718-368-5792
Follow Me on Twitter: @Schenck
KCC Class Schedule on Google Calendar: http://tinyurl.com/mqwlcy