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RE: Complete juvenile theropod unveiled in Germany



  It "looks" like a standard basal coelurosaurian. The extremely long tail (but 
without distally lengthed caudal vertebrae) and rostrally-restricted dentition, 
with the _caveat_ that this is a juvenile, imply at least a neotheropod, while 
the uncompressed third metatarsal (apparent even in juvenile comsognaths to 
some degree) imply a non-coelurosaurian. There's an ischial boot with a 
distinct pubosichiadic plate, and I wonder then if it's in the carnosaurian 
portion of the tree. The rostral maxilla has a "process" with the external bony 
nares extending caudally and giving it a "step," while the fibula is not 
strongly restricted below the tibiofibular crest, and these are features that 
crop up in the Neotetanurae at the level of megalosaurs, carnosaurs, and such. 
So I'd place my bets there. Note that I have no clue what the potential authors 
have to say about it.

Cheers,

  Jaime A. Headden
  The Bite Stuff (site v2)
  http://qilong.wordpress.com/

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
Backs)


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> Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2011 19:18:16 -0700
> From: pristichampsus@yahoo.com
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Complete juvenile theropod unveiled in Germany
>
> Do we have an idea of where this little guy fits in the theropod family tree?
>
> Jason
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Thomas R. Holtz, Jr." <tholtz@umd.edu>
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Cc:
> > Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 2:16 PM
> > Subject: RE: Complete juvenile theropod unveiled in Germany
> >
> > Even higher-res image of the new guy:
> >
> > http://mineralientage.de/uploads/tx_downloads/P1150469.JPG
> >
> > Also, a comment on the article points out that the sedimentology resembles 
> > Late
> > Jurassic lithographic limestones, and they wonder if
> > the 135 Ma age is really supposed to be 153 Ma.
> >
> > Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> > Email: tholtz@umd.edu    Phone: 301-405-4084
> > Office: Centreville 1216
> > Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
> > Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
> > http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
> > Fax: 301-314-9661
> >
> > Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
> > http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
> > Fax: 301-314-9843
> >
> > Mailing Address:    Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> >             Department of Geology
> >             Building 237, Room 1117
> >             University of Maryland
> >             College Park, MD 20742 USA
> >