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Re: Complete juvenile theropod unveiled in Germany



Mickey and Jaime -- you may both be right.  If the Compsognathidae of
conventional usage is paraphyletic (as some analyses have found), then
many characters used to unite _Compsognathus_ and _Juravenator_ would
be primitive for Coelurosauria.


Note also the short forelimbs of the new guy, with a big claw.
Typically compsognathid/basal coelurosaur.






Cheers

Tim





On Thu, Oct 13, 2011 at 2:42 PM, Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>   It "looks" like a standard basal coelurosaurian. The extremely long tail 
> (but without distally lengthed caudal vertebrae) and rostrally-restricted 
> dentition, with the _caveat_ that this is a juvenile, imply at least a 
> neotheropod, while the uncompressed third metatarsal (apparent even in 
> juvenile comsognaths to some degree) imply a non-coelurosaurian. There's an 
> ischial boot with a distinct pubosichiadic plate, and I wonder then if it's 
> in the carnosaurian portion of the tree. The rostral maxilla has a "process" 
> with the external bony nares extending caudally and giving it a "step," while 
> the fibula is not strongly restricted below the tibiofibular crest, and these 
> are features that crop up in the Neotetanurae at the level of megalosaurs, 
> carnosaurs, and such. So I'd place my bets there. Note that I have no clue 
> what the potential authors have to say about it.
>
> Cheers,
>
>  Jaime A. Headden
>  The Bite Stuff (site v2)
>  http://qilong.wordpress.com/
>
> "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)
>
>
> "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
> different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
> has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
> his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
> Backs)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------
>> Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2011 19:18:16 -0700
>> From: pristichampsus@yahoo.com
>> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>> Subject: Re: Complete juvenile theropod unveiled in Germany
>>
>> Do we have an idea of where this little guy fits in the theropod family tree?
>>
>> Jason
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> > From: "Thomas R. Holtz, Jr." <tholtz@umd.edu>
>> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>> > Cc:
>> > Sent: Wednesday, 12 October 2011 2:16 PM
>> > Subject: RE: Complete juvenile theropod unveiled in Germany
>> >
>> > Even higher-res image of the new guy:
>> >
>> > http://mineralientage.de/uploads/tx_downloads/P1150469.JPG
>> >
>> > Also, a comment on the article points out that the sedimentology resembles 
>> > Late
>> > Jurassic lithographic limestones, and they wonder if
>> > the 135 Ma age is really supposed to be 153 Ma.
>> >
>> > Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
>> > Email: tholtz@umd.edu    Phone: 301-405-4084
>> > Office: Centreville 1216
>> > Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
>> > Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
>> > http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
>> > Fax: 301-314-9661
>> >
>> > Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
>> > http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
>> > Fax: 301-314-9843
>> >
>> > Mailing Address:    Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
>> >             Department of Geology
>> >             Building 237, Room 1117
>> >             University of Maryland
>> >             College Park, MD 20742 USA
>> >
>
>