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RE: so, would it be surprising, or not, to find an almost identical specimen of a dino (say, allosaurus)....



> From: owner-DINOSAUR@usc.edu [mailto:owner-DINOSAUR@usc.edu] 
> On Behalf Of Anthony Docimo
>
> > Date: Thu, 27 Oct 2011 07:19:11 -0700
> > From: hammeris1@att.net
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: so, would it be surprising, or not, to find an 
> almost identical specimen of a dino (say, allosaurus)....
> > 
> > in strata 30 million years apart with virtually no change?
> > Or does the environment of post-Cretaceous Aves allow for a 
> species to 
> > remain virtually unchanged for many millions of years?
> 
> my first thought would be, check to be sure it's a lazarus 
> species, and not an elvis species.  (or a case of a fossil 
> weathering out and then being re-buried)
>       

The latter are termed "zombie taxa" by Archibald (1996. Dinosaur extinction and 
the end of an era.)

But, as pointed out already, this case is neither: it is simply imprecision in  
a news report about a paper.

Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
Email: tholtz@umd.edu   Phone: 301-405-4084
Office: Centreville 1216                        
Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
Fax: 301-314-9661               

Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
Fax: 301-314-9843

Mailing Address:        Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
                        Department of Geology
                        Building 237, Room 1117
                        University of Maryland
                        College Park, MD 20742 USA