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Re: news on the stolen dinosaur from Patagonia



On 6 September 2011 13:52, Sebastian Apesteguia
<sebapesteguia@yahoo.com.ar> wrote:
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Rescued from truncation:

As I described before, in 2007, my team and I worked again in a quarry
in North Patagonia where we worked from 1999 up to 2007 (not
continuously since the owner of the field only permitted activity in
some few years).

That year, Akiko Shinya, part of the team composed by Pablo Gallina,
Peter Makovicky, Attila Osi, Alejandro Otero y Nathan Smith, Jorge
González and myself, she found an articulated theropod related to
abelisaurs. Some days after the finding one of the field trucks was
severely broken and the fieldwork had to end sooner. We expected to
return the following year and prepared the jacket for the theropod.
This never occurred. At the following year, assumed a new authorithy
in the Dept of Cultura (those who give fieltrip permitts), and the guy
was a personal friend of the Museo Patagonico. He denyed our permitts
and gave them to the Museo Patagonico.
In 2009, the Museo Patagónico (General Roca, Argentina), in
collaboration with the Museum of Sao Paulo (Brazil), made a fieldtrip
for fossils to our same quarry.
In Aug 2011 the staff from the Museo Patagonico called the media to
announce their new finding: Nototyrannus violantei, providing genus
and species without scientific publication.
We realized that was the specimen Akiko found and we protested. The
Museo Patagonico called me a layer and many other things.
We presented photographs comparing the specimen (see picture at:
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=2217117620915&set=a.2216982057526.126090.1036837169&type=1&theater).as
just found in 2007 and after prep in 2010 to the Argentinian
Paleontological Association and to the person we suspected was the
main researcher of the publication.
He recognized that it was the same specimen and renounced to be part
in the publication, along the Brazilian colleague that led the
excavation. They’ve said they were deceived by the staff of the Museo
Patagonico. There are also two North American researchers involved in
the study. I hope they will step aside too. However, I have to
recognize that it is sad since they've lost time and energy in
describing it, ignoring the true origin of the bones.
However, the material is still in the hands of the staff of the
museum, aside with 33 sauropod coprolites (projected for a PhD thesis
that was never made), and some bones of a basal titanosaur that we
collected in 2007 and were taken by these persons denying our right to
study them. The Province authorities are their friends and legally
nothing can be done yet. That´s why I’m disturbing you, guys, just to
let you know. A theropod, not a tyrannosauroid as he said but most
probably a basal abelisauroid or wonderful coprolites can be offered
by these persons.
They will try to have them published but they didn’t found them. As
they love the media they’ll offer them again soon.
Up to now, only some few scientists wrote to these guys to tell them
to return the publication rights to their discoverers, but nothing
happened yet.
To those who want to know more or see pictures of the excavation and
the bones enter to:
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2216982057526.126090.1036837169&l=de87a537c6&type=1
In the last picture there is a comparison of the same bone as found in
2007 and as presented now by the Museo Patagonico.
I know. These things are not Paleontology, but I think we all agree in
there must be ethics here. Without ethics, we are back to the stone
age, but not the way we'd like as paleontologists.
Regards. Sebastián.


Dr. Sebastián Apesteguía
Fundación de Historia Natural 'Félix de Azara' -
CEBBAD (CONICET) - Universidad Maimónides.
Hidalgo 775, Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA
Tel-fax: 5411-49051100 ext. 1228,
sebapesteguia@gmail.com, www.fundacionazara.org.ar