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RE: Philovenator, new troodontid from Late Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia, China



  This wasn't initially intended. Frederich von Huene named *Halticosaurus 
liliensternus* in 1934. Sam Welles regarded the *Halticosaurus* container to be 
inadequate, instead comparing *liliensterni* to his newly coined *Megalosaurus 
wetherilli*. Rather than place *liliensterni* into *Dilophosaurus,* Welles 
argued (1984, 50 years later) that *liliensterni* was more intermediate between 
*wetherilli* and conventional "coelophysoids," and thus chose to avoid 
potential paraphyly by coining *Liliensternus*.

Cheers,

  Jaime A. Headden
  The Bite Stuff (site v2)
  http://qilong.wordpress.com/

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
Backs)


----------------------------------------
> Date: Tue, 24 Apr 2012 11:25:43 +0200
> From: j.falconnet@gmail.com
> To: tyazbeck@comcast.net
> CC: bcreisler@gmail.com; dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Philovenator, new troodontid from Late Cretaceous of Inner 
> Mongolia, China
>
> How come ?
>
> This name refers not only to the name of Philip Currie, but also to its
> Greek root 'philos', for 'beloved', 'dear', or 'friend'. This name
> designates therefore either a dear/beloved/friend
> snatcher/thief/assassin (ok, the latter is a bit disturbing...) or
> merely 'Phil's raptor'. I think it is a nice tribute to Philip Currie to
> have named this genus after his name.
>
> Besides, there is much worse - *Liliensternus liliensterni*, for
> instance. Not very imaginative, don't you think ?
>
> Cheers,
> Jocelyn
>
>
> Le 24/04/2012 10:50, tyazbeck@comcast.net a écrit :
> > I'm sorry, but giving a dinosaur a binomial in which the genus AND species 
> > names are named after the *same* person is in bad taste...
> >
> > From: "Ben Creisler"<bcreisler@gmail.com>
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Sent: Monday, April 23, 2012 12:48:56 PM
> > Subject: Philovenator, new troodontid from Late Cretaceous of Inner 
> > Mongolia, China
> >
> > From: Ben Creisler
> > bcreisler@gmail.com
> >
> >
> > A new taxon Philovenator (named in part for Phil Currie) in the new
> > issue of Vertebrata PalAsiatica:
> >
> > XU Xing, ZHAO Qi, Corwin Sullivan, TAN Qing-wei, Martin SANDER& MA
> > Qing-yu (2012)
> > THE TAXONOMY OF THE TROODONTID IVPP V 10597 RECONSIDERED.
> > Vertebrata PalAsiatica 50(2):140-150
> > http://www.ivpp.cas.cn/cbw/gjzdwxb/xbwzxz/201204/P020120423369968204026.pdf
> >
> >
> > The partial troodontid hindlimb IVPP V 10597 was originally described
> > as a juvenile Sauronithoides mongoliensis. The present study
> > reconsiders the taxonomic placement of this interesting specimen,
> > given the significant advances in understanding of the Troodontidae
> > that have taken place since it was first described. Morphological
> > comparison and numerical phylogenetic analyses indicate that V 10597
> > is more closely related to the sympatric Linhevenator tani than to
> > Sauronithoides mongoliensis, raising the possibility that V 10597
> > might be juvenile L. tani. However, V 10597 differs significantly from
> > other troodontids, including L. tani, in numerous hindlimb features
> > and particularly in the proportions of various hindlimb elements.
> > These differences are likely to be taxonomic, and suggest that V 10597
> > represents a new troodontid. Furthermore, histological analysis
> > indicates that V 10597 is unlikely to be juvenile of L. tani or any
> > other large troodontid. Based on the available morphological and
> > histological information, we propose the erection of a new taxon,
> > Philovenator curriei gen. et sp. nov., based on V 10597. This new find
> > increases the known taxonomic diversity and morphological disparity of
> > Late Cretaceous troodontids.
> >
>
>
> --
> "/As a Professor of Science, I assure you we did in fact evolve from
> filthy monkey men./" Hubert J. Farnworth.