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RE: The best dinosaur documentary possible




It's sooooo important to involve the public rather than present a discovery
as if all the work has been done and a final consensus has been reached among 
the
researchers. What's the fun in that ?? The public would love to be involved in a
mystery that is enduring from one year to the next.

I really don't think the public is very supportive if they get the idea that 
all the
work has been done and it is just being rehashed from one year to the next. Why 
bother
supporting further research ??

A perfect example of this is Dienocheirus mirificus. Now there's a mystery that 
has
endured for decades. But no mention of it. It won't even BE in a documentary 
until
someone finds a complete specimen minus the decades of speculative thought on 
the 
beast. The public is left out of the decades long adventure and not given a 
chance
to fund any of it until someone actually trips over one.

Anybody interested in setting up our own motion picture industry .. 
specializing in
palaeo docs ?? You know you waaaaannt it !!

-d.  
> Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 10:34:10 -0500
> From: skeletaldrawing@gmail.com
> To: bensen.daniel@gmail.com
> CC: tholtz@umd.edu; Mark.Witton@port.ac.uk; dinosaur@usc.edu; 
> dracontes@gmail.com
> Subject: Re: The best dinosaur documentary possible
> 
> I heartily agree with Tom that there's no one right way to do a dino
> documentary, but one thing I'd really like to see more of is science
> being done (e.g. the gathering of data and testing of ideas). Too many
> documentaries talk about the discovery and have B-roll of excavation
> and prep lab work, and then suddenly they are showing you (with flashy
> animations) what the interpretation is. Let's get rid of the "here a
> miracle happens" stage and actually make a good show about
> paleontologists doing paleontology.
> 
> Maybe a series of episodes, some of which end unresolved (but with
> legitimate disagreements over the data, not a false controversy like
> regarding birds coming from dinosaurs, or an obligate scavenging T.
> rex) where viewers could understand why there is no consensus, while
> in others the show could help viewers understand why something is no
> longer considered controversial that perhaps once was.
> 
> I'm all for flashy animations (if anatomically accurate), but I'd like
> to see them help viewers understand how science works more often,
> rather than just be the eye-candy that keeps you watching despite the
> droning of talking heads in 13 second increments.
> 
> Also, really big wages for consultants.
> 
> -Scott
> 
> On Tue, Aug 28, 2012 at 9:15 AM, Daniel Bensen <bensen.daniel@gmail.com> 
> wrote:
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> 
> -- 
> Scott Hartman
> Scientific Advisor/Technical Illustrator
> (307) 921-9750
> (608) 620-4030
> website: www.skeletaldrawing.com
> blog: http://skeletaldrawing.blogspot.com/                                    
>