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RE: Crocodilians by the millions! Special issue of Zoological Journal!



Moreover, *Fruitachampsa callinsoni* finally gets published! This one's been 
rolling around for a while.

Clarke, J. M. 2012. A new shartegosuchid crocodyliform from the Upper Jurassic 
Morrison Formation of western Colorado. _Zoological Journal of the Linnean 
Society_ 163:S152–S172.
direct link: 
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00719.x/pdf

Cheers,

  Jaime A. Headden
  The Bite Stuff (site v2)
  http://qilong.wordpress.com/

"Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)


"Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
Backs)


----------------------------------------
> Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2012 23:14:18 -0800
> From: mickey_mortimer111@msn.com
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: RE: Crocodilians by the millions! Special issue of Zoological 
> Journal!
>
>
> Very cool papers.  I like the detail in de Andrade et al.'s Goniopholis 
> paper, but have a nit pick.  There are apparently two taxa which have been 
> suggested to be synonyms- Siamosuchus phuphokensis and "Goniopholis" 
> phuwiangensis.  The authors run both in their analysis and find them to have 
> similar but different positions, which is fine.  But then "in order to 
> evaluate the possibility that ‘G.’ phuwiangensis is at least congeneric with 
> Si. phuphokensis, a fourth additional analysis was carried out, using a 
> single terminal to combine the non-overlapping data on both taxa." The 
> authors find it "has a feeble impact on the final indexes, when compared to 
> the second supplementary run, and increases the final number of topologies 
> obtained, resulting in a less resolved consensus,"  Which is interesting, but 
> troublingly they conclude "These results indicate that there is no support 
> for the idea that ‘G.’ phuwiangensis is more related to Siamosuchus than to 
> Sunosuchus or Eutretauranosuchus..."
>
> But they indicate no such thing.  If you combine parts of unrelated taxa and 
> run the chimaera in an analysis, there's no greater liklihood the resulting 
> trees will have "better" indices or more most parsimonious trees.  For 
> instance, imagine if your analysis included two alvarezsaurids, Alvarezsaurus 
> and Mononykus.  Then you run another analysis, but with Mononykus' front half 
> joined with Ornitholestes' back half.  It would probably have a better 
> consistancy index, merely because you wouldn't have all of the extra 
> parvicursorine-bird convergences in the pelvis and hindlimb.  But those 
> convergences are real.  de Andrade et al. make the mistake Peters does in 
> thinking a low consistancy index is better, when really it all depends on how 
> much homoplasy is in the real tree.  Similarly, you could imagine that the 
> normal tree might have alvarezsaurids in a trichotomy with ornithomimosaurs 
> and maniraptorans, but maybe the maniraptoran similarity is due to posterior 
> characters of Mononykus, and the more basal posterior morphology of 
> Ornitholestes moves the partially chimaerical Alvarezsauridae sister to 
> Ornithomimosauria in all trees.  Then the chimaerical analysis would have a 
> more resolved consensus than the real analysis.  I have no idea if these 
> kinds of conditions are affecting the crocodilian analyses and no opinion on 
> the synonymy of the two taxa I hadn't heard of before today, but authors need 
> to understand how phylogenetic analysis works.
>
> Mickey Mortimer
>
> ----------------------------------------
> > Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2012 10:41:33 -0800
> > From: bcreisler@gmail.com
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: Crocodilians by the millions! Special issue of Zoological Journal!
> >
> > From: Ben Creisler
> > bcreisler@gmail.com
> >
> >
> > This item came out yesterday but has not been mentioned yet on the
> > DML. A special supplement issue of the Zoological Journal of the
> > Linnean Society is devoted to the 1st Symposium on the Evolution of
> > Crocodyliforms. All the pdfs are FREE!
> >
> >
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/zoj.2011.163.issue-s1/issuetoc
> >
> >
> > Many Mesozoic crocs are discussed and some new genera and species are
> > described. I'll cite the new taxa for now. The correct date for these
> > taxa is a bit murky--it's officially the December 2011 issue but it
> > was put on line (published?) in 2012. The "how to cite" feature says
> > 2011.
> >
> >
> >
> > Caryonosuchus
> >
> > KELLNER, A. W. A., CAMPOS, D. A., RIFF, D. and DE ANDRADE, M. B. (2011)
> > A new crocodylomorph (Sphagesauridae, Notosuchia) with horn-like
> > tubercles from Brazil. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 163:
> > S57-S65.
> > doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00712.x
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00712.x/abstract
> >
> >
> > A new species of a bizarre notosuchian mesoeucrocodylian is reported
> > here. Caryonosuchus pricei gen. et sp. nov. was found in the outcrops
> > of the Adamantina Formation (Campanian-Masstrichtian) in São Paulo
> > State, Brazil, and shows a typical sphagesaurid dentition: strong and
> > short teeth, obliquely implanted with the crown of the upper teeth
> > showing a rounded anteriolabial margin and a strong compressed
> > posteriolingual edge developed into a carina, ornamented by developed
> > ridges and denticles. Amongst the diagnostic features of the new taxon
> > are the presence of horn-like tubercles on the premaxilla and maxilla,
> > never reported in this group before. The occurrence of C. pricei
> > increases the diversity of sphagesaurids and confirms that all members
> > of this clade, only recorded in Late Cretaceous deposits from Brazil
> > so far, share the same dentition.
> >
> > ===
> >
> >
> > DE ANDRADE, M. B., EDMONDS, R., BENTON, M. J. and SCHOUTEN, R. (2011)
> > A new Berriasian species of Goniopholis (Mesoeucrocodylia, Neosuchia)
> > from England, and a review of the genus.
> > Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 163: S66-S108.
> > doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00709.x
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00709.x/abstract
> >
> > A new species, Goniopholis kiplingi sp. nov., based on an
> > exceptionally preserved skull from the Lower Cretaceous of England is
> > described in detail. It shows great similarity with Goniopholis simus
> > and Goniopholis baryglyphaeus, but can be distinguished by the
> > presence of longer lachrymals, smooth (not edged) dorsal surface of
> > the quadrate, and proportionally longer rostrum. A comprehensive
> > phylogenetic analysis of Mesoeucrocodylia (104 taxa; 486 characters)
> > focused on goniopholidids (14 species) places G. kiplingi as
> > sister-group of G. simus, and as part of a monophyletic group also
> > containing G. baryglyphaeus. The relationships of Nannosuchus
> > gracilidens and three undescribed European taxa are explored, and
> > preliminary analyses of Denazinosuchus kirtlandicus (Upper Cretaceous,
> > USA) and 'Goniopholis' phuwiangensis (Lower Cretaceous, Thailand) are
> > presented. The assignment of taxa to the genus Goniopholis is
> > discussed. Goniopholis, in its traditional sense, is considered
> > paraphyletic and a restricted updated definition is proposed, with
> > comments on the evolution of other goniopholidids. Morphological
> > characteristics of fragmentary material attributed to Goniopholis are
> > not considered sufficient to secure their generic/specific assignment,
> > and provide no support for the presence of Goniopholis in Gondwanan
> > and/or Upper Cretaceous sedimentary units. Currently Goniopholis is
> > restricted to the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous of Europe.
> >
> > ===
> >
> > Labidiosuchus
> >
> > KELLNER, A. W. A., FIGUEIREDO, R. G., AZEVEDO, S. A. K. and CAMPOS, D. A. 
> > (2011)
> > A new cretaceous notosuchian (Mesoeucrocodylia) with bizarre dentition
> > from Brazil. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 163:
> > S109-S115.
> > doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00711.x
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00711.x/abstract
> >
> >
> > A new species of Notosuchia, Labidiosuchus amicum gen. et sp. nov., is
> > described based on an incomplete lower jaw (DGM 1480-R) from the Upper
> > Cretaceous Marília Formation (Maastrichtian) recovered from a quarry
> > near the Peirópolis municipality, Minas Gerais State, Southeastern
> > Brazil. The mandibular symphysis is long, strong anterodorsally
> > projected and 'Y-shaped'. The bizarre dentition is formed by at least
> > eight teeth placed in a symphyseal tooth battery, some located lateral
> > to each other. The first pair is larger than all others and
> > procumbent. Some teeth are obliquely implanted (anterolabially to
> > posterolingually) and have sub circular to elliptical outline. At
> > least the posterior teeth are single cuspidate with acute apex.
> > Labidiosuchus amicum shows a rather bizarre dentition, increasing the
> > taxonomic diversity and potential feeding strategies of notosuchian
> > crocodylomorphs.
> >
> > ====
> >
> > Fruitachampsa
> >
> > CLARK, J. M. (2011)
> > A new shartegosuchid crocodyliform from the Upper Jurassic Morrison
> > Formation of western Colorado.
> > Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 163: S152-S172.
> > doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00719.x
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00719.x/abstract
> >
> >
> >
> > A small new basal crocodyliform, Fruitachampsa callisoni gen. nov.,
> > sp. nov., is represented by several partial skeletons from the
> > Morrison Formation at the Fruita Paleontological Area near Grand
> > Junction, Colorado. It is placed in the Family Shartegosuchidae
> > Efimov, 1988, previously comprising three genera from the Late
> > Jurassic locality of Shar Teeg in western Mongolia and possibly a
> > fourth genus from the Early Cretaceous of Siberia. Shartegosuchids
> > share a sculpted palatal surface of the pterygoids, the absence of a
> > mandibular fenestra, and posterior maxillary teeth and post-caniniform
> > dentary teeth with a flat and horizontal apical region and vertical
> > crenulations extending basally from it. Fruitachampsa and
> > Shartegosuchus form a clade supported by ventral half of the lacrimal
> > tapering ventroposteriorly, sculpturing on palatines, and lower teeth
> > absent anterior to caniniforms. The shartegosuchids are most
> > parsimoniously considered to be outside of the mesoeucrocodylian clade
> > and are possibly allied with the Asian taxa Shantungosuchus,
> > Sichuanosuchus, and Zosuchus. Fruitachampsa is unusual in possessing a
> > series of small protuberances along the occipital margin of the
> > parietal and squamosal and procoelous vertebrae, and lacking an
> > antorbital fenestra or fossa. This is the first occurrence of a
> > shartegosuchid in North America, and the close relationship of
> > Fruitachampsa with Shartegosuchus nested among other Asian taxa
> > indicates it dispersed to North America from Asia.
> >
> > ====
> >
> > Pietraroiasuchus
> >
> > BUSCALIONI, A. D., PIRAS, P., VULLO, R., SIGNORE, M. and BARBERA, C. (2011)
> > Early eusuchia crocodylomorpha from the vertebrate-rich Plattenkalk of
> > Pietraroia (Lower Albian, southern Apennines, Italy).
> > Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 163: S199-S227.
> > doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00718.x
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00718.x/abstract
> >
> >
> > The locality of Pietraroia (Lower Albian, southern Apennines, Italy)
> > has provided two fully articulated crocodylomorphs, exposed in ventral
> > and in dorsal aspect, which are described here as representing a new
> > species of a new genus, Pietraroiasuchus ormezzanoi gen. nov, sp. nov.
> > The new taxon is found to be the sister taxon of Pachycheilosuchus
> > trinquei from the Albian of the Glen Rose Formation, Texas.
> > Pietraroiasuchus ormezzanoi resolves the phylogenetic position of the
> > controversial P. trinquei, and is crucial in enabling an extensive
> > understanding of the family Hylaeochampsidae. Phylogenetic analysis
> > places Hylaeochampsa vectiana as a sister group of Iharkutosuchus
> > makadii plus Pachycheilosuchus and Pietraroiasuchus. The phylogenetic
> > result reveals the presence of an evolutionary mosaicism within
> > non-crocodylian eusuchians. Mosaic features in Pietraroiasuchus are
> > denoted by the combination of primitive character states, such as the
> > position of the choana with its anterior margin formed by an inverted
> > V-shaped palatine processeses, and the presumed presence of a tiny
> > antorbital fossa, in conjunction with derived states involving the
> > slight vertebral procoelia, the presence of tetraserial segmented
> > dermal armour with an accessory lateral row, and isolated nuchal
> > osteoderms. The disjoint occurrence between Pachycheilosuchus and
> > Pietraroiasuchus species suggests that Pietraroia was a refuge island
> > inhabited by endemic forms.
> >
> > ===
> >
> > Not a new taxon, but relevant to dinosaurs:
> >
> >
> > RIFF, D. and KELLNER, A. W. A. (2011)
> > Baurusuchid crocodyliforms as theropod mimics: clues from the skull
> > and appendicular morphology of Stratiotosuchus maxhechti (Upper
> > Cretaceous of Brazil).
> > Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 163: S37-S56.
> > doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00713.x
> > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2011.00713.x/abstract
> >
> > The Baurusuchidae crocodyliforms are usually interpreted as active
> > terrestrial predators, but only some positive evidence of such habits
> > has been described to date, mainly the relative position of external
> > nares and orbits. Here we describe features that support this view in
> > a complete specimen of the Baurusuchidae Stratiotosuchus maxhechti,
> > and have executed a parsimony analysis to confirm their phylogenetic
> > position. S. maxhechti exhibits theropodomorph features that have been
> > previously recognized in skulls of the Baurusuchidae, as well as
> > postcranial characteristics related to a parasagittal gait, showing
> > that the similarities between the Baurusuchidae and theropods extend
> > beyond the cranial morphology. These include a well-developed
> > supracetabular crest, a relatively medially offset femoral head and a
> > caudally orientated calcaneal tuber. The orientations of the surfaces
> > for muscular attachments imply that the appendicular movements of S.
> > maxhechti were mainly anteroposterior, with abduction significantly
> > constrained. S. maxhechti presents features that mimic some present in
> > theropods, including a 'fossa brevis' on the ilium and tubercles on
> > the ischium and femur similar to the obturator process and accessory
> > trochanter. The relative proportions of the femur, tibia, and longer
> > metatarsal are more similar to those of Postosuchus than to other
> > Crocodylomorpha. In the skull, besides the theropodomorph (ziphodont)
> > dentition concentrated in the anterior half of the rostrum, the
> > baurusuchids are remarkable by the fusion of the nasals, which can be
> > related to a large resistance against feeding forces acting on a
> > high-profile skull. The appendicular morphology of S. maxhechti
> > strengthens the interpretation that the Baurusuchidae were active
> > land-dwelling predators in the Upper Cretaceous of south-eastern
> > Brazil, occuping ecological niches typical of small to medium-sized
> > theropod dinosaurs.
>