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RE: New theropod material from Cretaceous of Brazil



"First Brazilian carcharodontosaurid" suggests to me the 
first known remains of a carcharodontosaurid from Brazil, 
which these are not (by the authors' own admission). It 
also seems to suggest more than just isolated teeth, yet 
a maxillary fragment is hardly more--not enough to name a 
new taxon apparently--and isolated teeth did represent a 
carcharodontosaur from Brazil. So yes, the abstract title 
is misleading, though it doesn't seem deliberate. 

Writing a good abstract is not so easy, but it's not that 
hard to come up with a title that's accurate. No one was 
reading anything *into* the title; Mickey pointed out 
qualifiers that are missing from it. You shouldn't have 
to read things into a title. The title of a paper is an 
abstract of the abstract.

If I title a paper "First red dog in the neighborhood" and 
in the abstract immediately add, "other than the red dogs 
that were already known from here" then my title sucks. 
As a reader, you can't be expected to translate my title 
in your head as "Possibly the first red dog that's more 
complete than other red dogs that might already have been 
known from around here." 

Nor is Edgar Allen Poe relevant to scientific writing. 
(though i like Poe.)


--- On Fri, 7/27/12, Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com> wrote:

> From: Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com>
> Subject: RE: New theropod material from Cretaceous of Brazil
> To: "Mickey Mortimer" <mickey_mortimer111@msn.com>, 
> Dinosaur.Mailing.List@listproc.usc.edu
> Date: Friday, July 27, 2012, 6:30 AM
> 
> The title is a primer for the subject matter in the paper,
> and the abstract is the fleshed out descriptor the title
> alludes to. This is not 18th Century English literature, one
> does not need to describe in the title the qualifications of
> every noun and adjective which is being used. 
> 
> Is Poe's poem "the Raven" about the raven? How can it truly
> be a raven, but perhaps not a rook, did he perform a
> experiment to verify the raven-ness? Surely, a common crow
> indeed! Plus, the poem is about 
 loss of his wife -- not a bird. I think you are reading far
> too much into the title and not enough into the abstract
> itself, and all this leads into the real issue:
> 
> It's a partial presentation at SVP well over a decade old.
> The title is a tantalizer, even if it's missing a qualifier,
> but the abstract, and the presentation itself (likely)
> contain far more explicit and qualifying information. And
> that's what really matters here, in my opinion.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
>   Jaime A. Headden
>   The Bite Stuff (site v2)
>   http://qilong.wordpress.com/
> 
> "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar
> (1969)
> 
> 
> "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with
> a
> different language and a new way of looking at things, the
> human race
> has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his
> language or
> his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast
> With a Billion Backs)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------
> > Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 17:27:18 -0700
> > From: mickey_mortimer111@msn.com
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: RE: New theropod material from Cretaceous of Brazil
> >
> 
> > But that's their abstract, not their title. 
> Where's "latest Cretaceous" or "non-dental" in "First
> Brazilian carcharodontosaurid and other new theropod
> dinosaur fossils from the Campanian–Maastrichtian
> Presidente Prudente Formation, São Paulo State,
> southeastern Brazil"?
> >
> > Mickey Mortimer
> >
> > ----------------------------------------
> > > From: qi_leong@hotmail.com
> > > To: mickey_mortimer111@msn.com; dinosaur@usc.edu
> > > Subject: RE: New theropod material from Cretaceous of Brazil
> > > Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 18:16:20 -0600
> > >
> > >
> > > One should note that in their abstract, they state
> that they report "the first latest Cretaceous
> carcharodontosaurid known from non-dental remains anywhere".
> So there are several specifications being used, including 1)
> latest 2) Cretaceous 3) non-dental, and 4) from anywhere.
> These 
wn from elsewhere in Europe, Africa, or South America,
> but are also from Brazil, and are non-dental in form. They
> quite clearly emphasize "non-dental." Previous records, and
> by this I mean virtually all (if not _actually_ ALL) of the
> previous reports are of teeth, and teeth unambiguously
> alone.
> > >
> > > Cheers,
> > >
> > > Jaime A. Headden
> > > The Bite Stuff (site v2)
> > > http://qilong.wordpress.com/
> > >
> > > "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)
> > >
> > >
> > > "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
> > > different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
> > > has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
> > > his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a 
> > > Billion Backs)
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------
> > > > Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 15:57:33 -0700
> > > > From: mickey_mortimer111@msn.com
> > > > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > > > Subject: RE: New theropod material from Cretaceous of Brazil
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > This seems to be the latest example of lying about describing the 
> > > > "first X from Y"...
> > > >
> > > > "First Brazilian carcharodontosaurid"
> > > >
> > > > and yet...
> > > >
> > > > "Previous theropod records from the Bauru
> Basin comprise Abelisauridae and Tetanurae and in São Paulo
> state these have been represented by only a right premaxilla
> of an abelisaurid and isolated abelisaurid and
> carcharodontosaurid teeth."
> > > >
> > > > The actual first carcharodontosaurid from Brazil was reported in 1998-
> > > >
> > > > Kellner and Campos, 1998. Review of Cretaceous theropods
> > > > and sauropods from Brazil. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18(3), 
> > > > 55A.
> > > >
> > > > Apparently "first carcharodontosaurid skull fragment from Brazil" 
> > > > didn't sound important enough.
> > > >
> > > > Mickey Mortimer
> > > >
> > > > ----------------------------------------
> > > > > Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 09:14:26 -0700
> > > > > From: bcreisler@gmail.c
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > > > > Subject: New theropod material from Cretaceous of Brazil
> > > > >
> > > > > From: Ben Creisler
> > > > > bcreisler@gmail.com
> > > > >
> > > > > A new online paper, but apparently no named new taxa (full text not 
> > > > > seen yet):
> > > > >
> > > > > Rodrigo P. Fernandes de Azevedo, Felipe Medeiros Simbras, Miguel
> > > > > Rodrigues Furtado, Carlos Roberto A. Candeiro & Lílian Paglarelli
> > > > > Bergqvist (2012)
> > > > > First Brazilian carcharodontosaurid and other new theropod dinosaur
> > > > > fossils from the Campanian–Maastrichtian Presidente Prudente
> > > > > Formation, São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil
> > > > > Cretaceous Research (advance online publication)
> > > > > http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cretres.2012.06.004
> > > > > http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667112001176
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > We report new theropod dinosaur material from the Presidente Prudente
> > > > > Formation (Campanian–Maastrichtian), Bauru Group, in southwestern São
> > > > > Paulo state. The material comprises a fragment of right maxilla of
> > > > > Carcharodontosauridae, an anterior portion of a left ilium of
> > > > > Abelisauroidea and a proximal portion of a right fibula of a
> > > > > coelurosaurian. Previous theropod records from the Bauru Basin
> > > > > comprise Abelisauridae and Tetanurae and in São Paulo state these have
> > > > > been represented by only a right premaxilla of an abelisaurid and
> > > > > isolated abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid teeth. The new material
> > > > > reported here represents the first theropod remains from the
> > > > > Presidente Prudente Formation, and includes the first abelisauroid and
> > > > > coelurosaurian postcranial remains from the Bauru Basin in São Paulo
> > > > > state and the first latest Cretaceous carcharodontosaurid known from
> > > > > non-dental remains anywhere.
> > > >
> > >
> >
>         
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>   
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