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RE: Having trouble pronouncing Dinosaur genus/species names





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> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2012 20:57:26 -0400
> From: tholtz@umd.edu
> To: chasmosaurs@gmail.com
> CC: john-schneiderman@cox.net; dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Having trouble pronouncing Dinosaur genus/species names
>
> Einiosaurus.

 

Khaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan was always tough for me.  
(that's at least 8 sylables, right?)

 

 

seriously, *Mamenchisaurus*  -- same reason as Mississippi: my brain keeps 
trying to repeat the "mame-" at least twice.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mamenchisaurus

 

 

 


> On Fri, June 15, 2012 8:51 pm, David Orr wrote:
> > What about Seitaad, Bistahieversor, Tatankacephalus... and I'm sure
> > more I'm not thinking of off the top of my head.
> >
> > David
> >
> > ---
> >
> > Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs: http://chasmosaurs.blogspot.com
> > Orogenic Design: http://www.davidorogenic.com
> > Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anatotitan
> >
> >
> >
> > On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 5:28 PM, <john-schneiderman@cox.net> wrote:
> >>
> >> I've always felt that since dinosaurs found in other countries seem to
> >> be using its language and use of tribal speak as sources of names
> >> [latinized in some cases] it is time we in the countries of North
> >> America [north of the Rio Grande] begin using native american words for
> >> new dinosaur names.
> >>
> >> Some examples: East coast [Mohican, Powhatan, Algonquin], Mid-west
> >> [Siouan language group], Mountain state [Dakota and Sioux languages],
> >> Southwestern states [Navajo, Zuni, Apache], West coast & Pacific
> >> northwest, Alaska, northern Canada [Inuktitut]
> >>
> >> Each language has a wonderful, rich culture, religion, and mythology a
> >> great source of very difficult names to pronounce but very much North
> >> American
> >>
> >> If I every find a mid-Cretaceous brachiosaurid on the Appalachian side
> >> of the Dakota Formation I'm sure to give it the name "Nishnabotnasaurus"
> >>
> >>
> >
>
>
> Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> Email: tholtz@umd.edu Phone: 301-405-4084
> Office: Centreville 1216
> Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
> Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
> http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
> Fax: 301-314-9661
>
> Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
> http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
> Fax: 301-314-9843
>
> Mailing Address: Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> Department of Geology
> Building 237, Room 1117
> University of Maryland
> College Park, MD 20742 USA