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RECEIVED - Dinosaur morphological diversity and the end-Cretaceous extinction - PDF REQUEST



Thanks all.

Jason

 

----- Original Message -----

> From: Jura <pristichampsus@yahoo.com>
> To: DML <dinosaur@usc.edu>
> Cc: 
> Sent: Thursday, 3 May 2012 11:19 AM
> Subject: Re: Dinosaur morphological diversity and the end-Cretaceous 
> extinction - PDF REQUEST
> 
> If anyone has access to his paper, I'd love to get a copy.
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Jason
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
>>  From: Robert Schenck <schenck.rob@gmail.com>
>>  To: DML <dinosaur@usc.edu>
>>  Cc: 
>>  Sent: Tuesday, 1 May 2012 12:25 PM
>>  Subject: Dinosaur morphological diversity and the end-Cretaceous extinction 
> paper, 2012
>> 
>>  http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n5/full/ncomms1815.html
>>  Stephen L. Brusatte,     Richard J. Butler,     Albert Prieto-Márquez     
> &
>>  Mark A. Norell
>> 
>>  "The extinction of non-avian dinosaurs 65 million years ago is a
>>  perpetual topic of fascination, and lasting debate has focused on
>>  whether dinosaur biodiversity was in decline before end-Cretaceous
>>  volcanism and bolide impact. Here we calculate the morphological
>>  disparity (anatomical variability) exhibited by seven major dinosaur
>>  subgroups during the latest Cretaceous, at both global and regional
>>  scales. Our results demonstrate both geographic and clade-specific
>>  heterogeneity. Large-bodied bulk-feeding herbivores (ceratopsids and
>>  hadrosauroids) and some North American taxa declined in disparity
>>  during the final two stages of the Cretaceous, whereas carnivorous
>>  dinosaurs, mid-sized herbivores, and some Asian taxa did not. Late
>>  Cretaceous dinosaur evolution, therefore, was complex: there was no
>>  universal biodiversity trend and the intensively studied North
>>  American record may reveal primarily local patterns. At least some
>>  dinosaur groups, however, did endure long-term declines in
>>  morphological variability before their extinction."
>> 
>> 
>>  What's up with this article, it's listed as, not Nature, but Nature
>>  Communications? Is there going to be an actual article publishe
at am I even
>>  requesting, an actual full Nature article or some 'notice' of a 
> study
>>  in "Nature Communications"? Forgive my ignorance.
>> 
>>  -- 
>>  Robert J. Schenck
>>  Kingsborough Community College
>>  Physical Sciences Department
>>  Follow Me on Twitter: @Schenck
>> 
>