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RE: Microraptor hanqingi, and what claws grip



> (would it be irony if it turned out the prey had tougher
> hides than the trees did?  so when maniraptors started
> putting their claws on trees, they went through like
> machetes through banana trees  (knife through hot
> butter, basically))

Who says they didn't start by putting their claws on trees, and then turned to 
putting their claws into prey?
Deinonychus came much later than archaeopteryx after all.

If later dromeosaurs retained stubby "wing feathers" on their arms (and some 
still had functional wings, ie microraptor, rahonavis), seems to me they came 
from an ancestor that had their arms function as an aerodynamic surface (its 
tempting to say they came from ancestors that could at least glide, but I'll 
stop short of that).

If the earlier forms had smaller claws, and apparently were often gliders, 
wouldn't it make more sense that the enlarged claw was a climbing adaptation 
first, then exapted for predatory uses?

--- On Wed, 5/30/12, Anthony Docimo <keenir@hotmail.com> wrote:

> From: Anthony Docimo <keenir@hotmail.com>
> Subject: RE: Microraptor hanqingi, and what claws grip
> To: tijawi@gmail.com, dinosaur@usc.edu
> Date: Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 12:50 AM
> 
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------
> > Date: Wed, 30 May 2012 09:14:36 +1000
> > From: tijawi@gmail.com
> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> > Subject: Re: Microraptor hanqingi, new species from
> China.
> >
> 
> 
> >
> > To complicate things further, if deinonychosaurs used
> their feet for
> > grasping (as proposed by the Raptor Prey Restraint
> hypothesis) , then
> > would we be able to distinguish trunk-climbing
> adaptations from
> > predatory ones?
> >
> > In other words, would adaptations used by _Deinonychus_
> to grasp and
> > hold onto large prey be that much different to
> adaptations used by
> > _Microraptor_ to scale a thick trunk? I'm not saying
> that
> > _Microraptor_ DID climb up trunks. But IF it
> did....would we know
> > from the morphology of the pes?
> 
>  
> 
> It would probably help to have a good sample size of prey
(and "tree") barks....just like not all fish
> have the armor skin of Alligator Gar *Atractosteus spatula*,
> not all trees would have the equally heavy-duty bark.
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> (would it be irony if it turned out the prey had tougher
> hides than the trees did?  so when maniraptors started
> putting their claws on trees, they went through like
> machetes through banana trees  (knife through hot
> butter, basically))
> 
>      
>         
>           
>   
>