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Re: More ornithomimid specimens found in France and other news stories



From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

Note that the paper about Cretalamna is  the following:



Mikael Siverson, Johan Lindgren, Michael G. Newbrey, Peter Cederström,
and Todd D. Cook 9(2013)
Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Campanian) mid-palaeolatitude sharks of
Cretalamna appendiculata type.
Acta Palaeontologica Polonica (in press)
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4202/app.2012.0137
http://www.app.pan.pl/article/item/app20120137.html


The type species of the extinct lamniform genus Cretalamna, C.
appendiculata, has been assigned a 50 Ma range (Albian to the
Ypresian) by a majority of previous authors. Analysis of a partly
articulated dentition of a Cretalamna from the Smoky Hill Chalk,
Kansas, USA (LACM 128126) and isolated teeth of the genus from
Cenomanian to Campanian strata of Western Australia, France, Sweden
and the Western Interior of North America, indicates that the name of
the type species, as applied to fossil material over the last 50
years, represents a large species complex. The middle Cenomanian part
of the Gearle Siltstone, Western Australia, yielded C. catoxodon sp.
nov. and ‘Cretalamna’ gunsoni. The latter, reassigned to the new genus
Kenolamna, shares several dental features with the Paleocene
Palaeocarcharodon. Early Turonian strata in France produced the type
species C. appendiculata, C. deschutteri sp. nov. and C. gertericorum
sp. nov. Cretalamna teeth from the late Coniacian part of the Smoky
Hill Chalk in Kansas are assigned to C. ewelli sp. nov., whereas LACM
128126, of earliest Campanian age, is designated as holotype of C.
hattini sp. nov. Early Campanian deposits in Sweden yielded C.
borealis and C. sarcoportheta sp. nov. A previous reconstruction of
the dentition of LACM 128126 includes a posteriorly situated upper
lateroposterior tooth, with a distally curved cusp, demonstrably
misplaced as a reduced upper ‘intermediate’ tooth. As originally
reconstructed, the dentition resembled that of cretoxyrhinids (sensu
stricto) and lamnids. Tooth morphology, however, indicates an
otodontid affinity for Cretalamna. The root is typically the most
diagnostic feature on an isolated Cretalamna tooth. This porous
structure is commonly abraded and/or corroded and, consequently, many
collected Cretalamna teeth are indeterminable at species level.


On Thu, Aug 22, 2013 at 3:26 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> From: Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
> A number of recent dino and paleo-related news stories:
>
> New dinosaur fossils from Early Cretaceous Charente site in France: 5
> more ornithomimid specimens (for 26 total so far) and sauropod teeth
> and vertebrae (in French)
>
>
> http://www.sudouest.fr/2013/08/21/des-dinos-et-des-pinceaux-1146355-811.php
>
> ==
>
>
> Two armored dinosaurs at Bakony, Hungary:  Struthiosaurus remains
> identified in addition to Hungarosaurus (in Hungarian)
>
> http://www.infogyor.hu/hir_olvas/permalink:mta-ket-pancelos-dinoszaurusz-is-elt-a-bakony-teruleten-2013-08-16-140249/
>
> ===
>
> New illustration of Canardia, hadrosaur from southern France (in Italian)
>
> http://www.nationalgeographic.it/scienza/2013/08/19/foto/l_ultimo_dei_dinosauri_europei_-1781977/1/
>
> ===
>
> Colorado elasmosaurid
>
> http://www.postindependent.com/news/grandjunction/7683616-113/foster-discovered-elasmosaurid-plesiosaur
>
> ==
>
> "Megalodon" related to Cretalamna, not to Great White Shark
>
> http://www.sciencewa.net.au/topics/fisheries-a-water/item/2345-research-debunks-great-white-lineage.html
>
>
>
> ===