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Re: The Dinosaur Feather



From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

Here's  a note about the French version of the book:
http://www.dinosauria.org/blog/2012/07/04/les-plumes-du-dinosaure-de-sissel-jo-gazan/


Frankly, I think a Sherlock Holmes mystery in which the London
Archaeopteryx is stolen would be more fun. The Conan Doyle stories
start in the 1880s when Owen and Huxley were still alive. (Charles
Darwin died in 1882, but he might show up if the tale starts earlier.)
No need for a murder, but maybe somebody could be attacked with a
fossil Megalosaurus tooth....

On Mon, Dec 9, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Richard W. Travsky <rtravsky@uwyo.edu> wrote:
> On 12/9/2013 8:00 AM, GSP1954@aol.com wrote:
>>
>> According to a review of the English translation in today's Wash Post (I
>> actually get the print edition), it seems that a S J Gazen murder mystery
>> The
>> Dinosaur Feather has been a big hit in Denmark for a few years. The title
>> is
>> not merely allegorical, the book is about the hellish murder of a Danish
>> paleontologist who works on bird origins (the reviewer correctly describes
>> the
>> current state of the science). Most paleos being a weird and insular bunch
>> (this writer obviously excepted) we are of course prone to liquiditating
>> one
>> another by ingenius means -- we lose one or two each SVP meeting. I admit
>> I
>> did not know that Copenhagen is a hotbed of dinopaleo.
>
>
>
> Brings to mind an old Far Side cartoon (which I was unable to find
> separately):
>
> http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1320&dat=19930507&id=fEZWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=buoDAAAAIBAJ&pg=1214,1932754
>
>
> "Professor LaVonne had many enemies in the
> entomological world, detective, but if you examine that
> data label, you'll find exactly when and where
> he was — shall we say — 'collected.' "
>