[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

"Gongpoquansaurus" and "Plesiohadros": yet-to-be described hadrosaurs from China and Mongolia



From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

A couple of dinosaur names have been kicking around the Internet
recently. They are scheduled to be published in late 2014 according to
the Indiana University Press website and so are still nomina nuda.
However, they already have Wikipedia entries and were featured in this
recent video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y96VumYsKyk&feature=youtube_gdata

**
Table of contents for the book "Hadrosaurs":

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=807281

**
For anybody eager for more info on the hadrosaur symposium in 2011,
the abstract volume is available at the link below, but the dinosaurs
named here don't appear to be included:

http://www.tyrrellmuseum.com/media/HadrSymp2011Abstract.pdf

==
The new names are:

"Gongpoquansaurus"

H.-l. You et al. (in press). "Gongpoquansaurus mazongshanensis (Lü,
1997) comb. nov. (Ornithischia: Hadrosauroidea) from the Early
Cretaceous of Gansu Province, northwestern China". In David A. Eberth
and David C. Evans (eds). Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International
Hadrosaur Symposium. Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-01385-9.

New name for: Probactrosaurus mazongshanensis Lü, 1997

The host in the video mentioned above can't figure out the
pronunciation of this one so here are some tips for an English
approximation.

from the name Gongpoquan (formerly transcribed as Kung-p'o-ch'üan), a
location in the Mazong Shan area of Gansu Province, north central
China. The dinosaur name likely refers to the Gongpoquan Basin, source
of dinosaur fossils.

Gongpoquansaurus

goong - po - chwen + saurus   [OR less accurately gong - po - kwan + saurus]

To get REALLY technical:

gong [character meaning "public"]:  the g here is really a voiceless
k-sound without a puff of breath (unaspirated); the "o" sounds like
the vowel in English "cook" (a short "oo" sound); ng is like in
"song"; first tone, level and high =  gōng.

po [character meaning "old woman"]: somewhat like in English with a
puff of breath (aspiration) but with a "w" sound  before a rounded
vowel sound that is more like "aw" in English rather than like "o" in
"poke"; second tone, rising = pó .

quan [character meaning "spring" (for water)]:  the q is an aspirated
(puff of breath) palatal ch-like sound (not found in English; a bit
like pronouncing the word "chin" but forced far forward in your mouth
with the tongue raised and the tip against the bottom teeth);  the u
is like in French or the German ü (not found in English) but here more
like a semi-vowel (as in French nuit, for example); -an sounds like
"en" in English "when" because of the preceding front vowel sound;
second tone, rising = quán.

The tone accents together are:     Gōngpóquán

The name Gongpoquansaurus would literally mean "public old woman spring lizard"!

==

"Plesiohadros"

Khishigjav Tsogtbaatar, David Weishampel, David C. Evans and Mahito
Watabe (in press). "A new hadrosauroid (Plesiohadros djadokhtaensis)
from the Late Cretaceous Djadokhtan fauna of southern Mongolia". In
David A. Eberth and David C. Evans (eds). Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of
the International Hadrosaur Symposium. Indiana University Press. ISBN
978-0-253-01385-9.