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Re: FW: Oviraptorosaur tail forms and functions



Is it possible that the oviraptorosaur tail, especially if equipped a
"fan" or similar structure at its tip, could have functioned as a sort
of fly swatter?

On Sun, Jan 13, 2013 at 10:54 PM, Jaime Headden <qi_leong@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> Pardon; this was sent accidentally only to the two respondents.
>
> ----------------------------------------
>> From: qi_leong@hotmail.com
>> To: tijawi@gmail.com; augustoharo@gmail.com
>> Subject: RE: Oviraptorosaur tail forms and functions
>> Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2013 20:53:59 -0700
>>
>>
>>   No matter, the hypothesis must reason how the elongated, flexible but 
>> perhaps far stiffer tail of dromaeosaurids, the less-stiffened tail of 
>> *Archaeopteryx* spp. and the short and somewhat or very flexible tail of 
>> oviraptorosaurs with its occassionally stiffened tip can be produced if by 
>> the same forces or constraints on behavior. This is especially important if 
>> a role in retrex-support and extent of such things is taken into account, as 
>> by all specimens recovered so far these things differ among the taxa.
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Jaime A. Headden
>> The Bite Stuff (site v2)
>> http://qilong.wordpress.com/
>>
>> "Innocent, unbiased observation is a myth." --- P.B. Medawar (1969)
>>
>>
>> "Ever since man first left his cave and met a stranger with a
>> different language and a new way of looking at things, the human race
>> has had a dream: to kill him, so we don't have to learn his language or
>> his new way of looking at things." --- Zapp Brannigan (Beast With a Billion 
>> Backs)
>>
>>
>> ----------------------------------------
>> > Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2013 14:37:35 +1100
>> > From: tijawi@gmail.com
>> > To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>> > Subject: Re: Oviraptorosaur tail forms and functions
>> >
>> > Ronald Orenstein <ron.orenstein@rogers.com> wrote:
>> >
>> > > I sent a query to the list that may have been lost in truncation: is it 
>> > > possible that the tail did serve an "aerodynamic" function, or at least 
>> > > a stabilizing function in running
>> > > (perhaps to make balancing or banking adjustments during rapid twists 
>> > > and turns), rather than for defense or display (though of course a 
>> > > colourful tail fan could still have
>> > > a display function)?
>> >
>> >
>> > This probably doesn't answer your question, but there is a hypothesis
>> > (Carrier et al., 2001) that reduced tail length reduced rotational
>> > inertia in maniraptorans, and therefore improved their ability to make
>> > sharp turns when running . This effect would be enhanced if the tail
>> > was not only short, but stouter closer to the base of the tail. But
>> > this hypothesis doesn't explain the development of terminal fusion of
>> > the tail vertebrae (such as forming a pygostyle), nor the presence of
>> > large feathers on the tail (including a tail "fan").
>> >
>> >
>> > Other hypotheses have proposed that large distal tail feathers could
>> > help with aerial ground-to-air leaps (Caple et al.,1983), or leaps
>> > from elevated surfaces to the ground (Garner et al., 1999). The
>> > former emphasizes the role of lift, the latter drag, in these
>> > incipient flight behaviors. But both models emphasize the role of the
>> > feathered forelimbs and tail in controlling body orientation while in
>> > the air, because in both cases the purpose of these leaps is prey
>> > capture (flying insects or terrestrial prey, respectively).
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Cheers
>> >
>> > Tim
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Cheers
>> >
>> > Tim
>>
>