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Re: Pterosaur stuff in Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition



From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


Here are the refs and abstracts from the new set of papers about
pterosaurs in Acta Geologica Sinica. The Chinese links still do not
have working (free?) pdf links.


LÜ Junchang and David W.E. HONE (2012)
A New Chinese Anurognathid Pterosaur and the Evolution of Pterosaurian
Tail Lengths.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6) :1317–1325
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12002
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12002/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206001&flag=1

A new anurognathid pterosaur specimen from the Middle Jurassic
Tiaojishan Formation of Qinglong, northern Hebie Province is
described. The new specimen is referred to Dendrorhynchoides, based on
the general morphology of the skeleton, but it represents a new
species, named here as Dendrorhynchoides mutoudengensis sp. nov.. It
is characterized by the presence of short, robust and straight teeth,
and bearing wing metacarpal approximately 40% of the length of
humerus. The new specimen provides further osteological information
for anurognathid pterosaurs, especially the presence of a relatively
elongate tail.


===

PENG Nan, LIU Yongqing, KUANG Hongwei, JIANG Xiaojun and XU Huan (2012)
Stratigraphy and Geochronology of Vertebrate Fossil-Bearing Jurassic
Strata from Linglongta, Jianchang County, Western Liaoning,
Northeastern China.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6):1326–1339
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12003
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12003/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206002&flag=1

Northeastern China contains widely distributed Jurassic terrestrial
strata that have yielded many spectacular mammal and pterosaur
fossils, in addition to feathered dinosaur fossils and more recent
discoveries from Jianchang, particularly from western Liaoning.
However, the fossil-bearing stratigraphic succession, regional
correlation, and age estimates of the fossils found in Jianchang
County and nearby areas have been contentious. Here, we report on the
vertebrate fossil-bearing Jurassic stratigraphy from Linglongta,
Jianchang County, western Liaoning, including a SHRIMP U-Pb zircon
date unambiguously associated with the fossil horizons. The primary
goal was to determine the vertebrate fossil-bearing succession. A
further aim was to provide age estimations for the fossil-bearing
horizon as well as the earliest appearance of feathered dinosaurs, the
eutherian–placental clade, and transitional pterosaurs. Field
investigations showed that the vertebrate fossil-bearing stratigraphic
succession in Jianchang County mainly consists of basal andesites
overlain by rhythmic tuffs and tuffaceous lacustrine sediments, with
the upper intermediate or acidic lavas interbedded with laminated more
or less tuffaceous lacustrine deposits. This sequence correlates well
with the Middle Jurassic Lanqi/Tiaojishan Formation in northeastern
China. Detailed and accurate field observations showed that the
well-preserved vertebrate fossils were buried in either the middle or
the upper fine-grained laminated lacustrine deposits. Previous and
current SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dates provide an age estimation of 161–159
Myr for the fossil-bearing horizon and vertebrates. This indicates
that the earliest appearance of feathered dinosaurs here was more than
159 Myr ago and unquestionably older than Archaeopteryx from Germany,
making these the earliest known feathered dinosaurs in the world.
Furthermore, the eutherian–placental clade and the known transitional
pterosaurs first emerged no later than 161 Myr. The vertebrate
assemblage unearthed recently from Linglongta and neighboring areas in
Jianchang County belongs to the Daohugou Biota. In addition to
feathered dinosaurs, this biota was characterized by mammals,
primitive pterosaurs, insects, and plants and was present in Inner
Mongolia, western Liaoning, and northern Hebei in northeastern China
during the Middle–Late Jurassic.

===

Lorna STEEL (2012)
The Pterosaur Collection at the Natural History Museum, London, UK: an
Overview and List of Specimens, with Description of Recent Curatorial
Developments.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6):1340–1355
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12004
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12004/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206003&flag=1

The pterosaur collection at the Natural History Museum is of great
historical importance. Most of the material is figured or cited, and
several specimens are types or casts of types. Pterosaurs from UK
localities are well represented, but foreign material is also present
as original specimens and as high quality casts. The entire collection
has been recorded in a database and curatorial improvements have been
made, which has improved physical and virtual access to the
collection. Although many of the specimens were collected as long ago
as the early 1800s, they are still useful today. A full list of
Natural History Museum pterosaur specimens is published, for the first
time since 1888.

===

Brian ANDRES (2012)
The Early Evolutionary History and Adaptive Radiation of the Pterosauria.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6):1356–1365
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12005
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12005/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206003&flag=1

Phylogenetic analyses of early pterosaur species are relatively new
and contradictory. However, they imply a similar evolutionary history
for early pterosaurs: a large divergence of all major early groups of
pterosaurs before the first named pterosaur species appeared in the
fossil record. This large, unsampled divergence may be a record of the
initial adaptive radiation of the pterosaurs, but a recent
comprehensive phylogenetic analysis reconstructs named Triassic
pterosaur species grouped together in a monophyletic clade with all
other major groups diverging later. Ten patterns that characterize
adaptive radiations put forward by Gavrilets and Losos (2009) are
assessed for congruence with the comprehensive phylogeny and two
previous phylogenies to determine which are consistent with our
notions of an adaptive radiation. Of the eight patterns that can be
applied to pterosaurs, only six vary between pterosaur phylogenies. Of
these six patterns, all apply to the three phylogenies with varying
amounts of support For many patterns, however, the comprehensive
phylogeny has a greater magnitude, shorter time span, or is the only
topology within which they can be assessed. Pterosaurs are
characterized by an adaptive radiation no matter which phylogeny is
considered, but congruence with the fossil record increases the
support and information content of a phylogeny by reducing the time
and area within which to reconstruct evolutionary history.

===

David W. E. HONE (2012)
Pterosaur Research: Recent Advances and a Future Revolution.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6):1366–1376
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12006
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12006/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206005&flag=1

In the years since the first description of a pterosaur specimen in
1784, pterosaur research has inevitably advanced considerably. However
the last decade has arguably seen a much greater increase in our
knowledge than the preceding two centuries. Since the turn of the new
millennium, more than 40 new pterosaur genera and species have been
described and whole new clades have been discovered, in addition to
much new data being developed on pterosaur anatomy, functional
morphology, palaeobiology, systematics, ecology and more. We are
perhaps at the start of a golden age of pterosaur research and much as
the dinosaurs underwent a revolution in the 1970s through to the early
1990s, now the Pterosauria are taking their turn. There is also a new
and wider interest in pterosaur work as it attracts both more
researchers and greater public interest. Pterosaurs appear to be an
increasingly popular aspect of paleontology in popular culture and of
interest to the media, both mainstream and digital.

===

Sankar CHATTERJEE and R. Jack TEMPLIN (2012)
The Flight Dynamics of Tapejara, a Pterosaur From the Early Cretaceous
of Brazil with a Large Cranial Crest.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6):1377–1388
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12007
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12007/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206006&flag=1

Tapejara wellnhoferi, a small azhdarchoid pterodactyloid from the
Early Cretaceous Santana Formation of Brazil, provides critical
information about the aerodynamic function of its spectacular head
crest. The cranial crests in pterodactyloids were sexually dimorphic
and are thought to have evolved in adult males in response to female
mate choice. However, the location of cranial crests in front of the
center of gravity would create instability in the yaw axis during
flight and may seem like a handicap. Vertically aligned webbed feet
probably suppressed the yawing rotations and instability from the
crest. Here we show that the crest functioned as a front rudder to
make agile turn and mediate flight control. A computer simulation
model suggests that Tapejara had a large excess of muscle power
available above the power required for continuous flapping flight. It
could easily takeoff from a perch, ground, or water surface and land
safely on the ground. It was an excellent glider with a gliding angle
close to 4° and a cruising speed of 27 km/h. Tapejara could soar
efficiently on the windward side of cliffs or circle on rising
thermals over tropical waters for efficient long-distance flight.
Various control surfaces in the wings of Tapejara analogous to the
slat, aileron, elevator, fin, rudder, and horizontal stabilizer of an
aircraft made pterodactyloids versatile flyers.

==

Xabier PEREDA-SUBERBIOLA, Fabien KNOLL, José Ignacio RUIZ-OMEÑACA,
Julio COMPANY and Fidel TORCIDA FERNÁNDEZ-BALDOR (2012)
Reassessment of Prejanopterus curvirostris, a Basal Pterodactyloid
Pterosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Spain.
Acta Geologica Sinica - English Edition 86 (6):1389–1401
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12008
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1755-6724.12008/abstract
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/view_abstract.aspx?file_no=201206007&flag=1

Prejanopterus curvirostra, from the Early Cretaceous of La Rioja
province, was the first pterosaur genus and species described from
Spain. The material comprises disarticulated cranial and postcranial
remains from several individuals. The fossil-bearing bed is assigned
to the lacustrine Leza Formation (eastern Cameros Basin, NW margin of
the Iberian Range). This unit is regarded as either
Berriasian-Valanginian or Barremian-Aptian. Prejanopterus curvirostris
(specific name emended) was originally diagnosed on the basis of
several characters of which the most significant was a lateral
curvature of the rostrum. Re-examination of the holotype (rostrum) and
paratype (partial rostrum with teeth) indicates that there is no
genuine sideways bend of the preserved premaxilla-maxilla segments,
but a slight dorsal curvature. Prejanopterus is characterized by a
unique combination of characters: an emended diagnosis is provided. In
contrast with previous estimates, the wing span of Prejanopterus was
probably not much (if ever) in excess of 2 m. A phylogenetic analysis
suggests that Prejanopterus is a basal pterodactyloid positioned
between Pterodactylus and Cycnorhamphus-Gallodactylus. Prejanopterus
represents the first evidence of Pterodactylidae in the Early
Cretaceous of the Iberian Peninsula.

=====

A quick note about the December 2012 issue of Acta Geologica Sinica -
English Edition, now available online.

-----

Wiley link:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acgs.2012.86.issue-6/issuetoc

Chinese link:
http://www.geojournals.cn/dzxben/ch/reader/issue_list.aspx?year_id=2012&quarter_id=6

----

LÜ Junchang, Dave M. UNWIN, JI Shu'an and JI Qiang (2012)
Brief Introduction to Papers on Pterosaurs (page 1316)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12001



LÜ Junchang and David W.E. HONE (2012)
A New Chinese Anurognathid Pterosaur and the Evolution of Pterosaurian
Tail Lengths (pages 1317–1325)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12002

PENG Nan, LIU Yongqing, KUANG Hongwei, JIANG Xiaojun and XU Huan (2012)
Stratigraphy and Geochronology of Vertebrate Fossil-Bearing Jurassic
Strata from Linglongta, Jianchang County, Western Liaoning,
Northeastern China (pages 1326–1339)

DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12003


Lorna STEEL (2012)
The Pterosaur Collection at the Natural History Museum, London, UK: an
Overview and List of Specimens, with Description of Recent Curatorial
Developments (pages 1340–1355)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12004


Brian ANDRES (2012)
The Early Evolutionary History and Adaptive Radiation of the
Pterosauria (pages 1356–1365)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12005



David W. E. HONE (2012)
Pterosaur Research: Recent Advances and a Future Revolution (pages 1366–1376)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12006



Sankar CHATTERJEE and R. Jack TEMPLIN (2012)
The Flight Dynamics of Tapejara, a Pterosaur From the Early Cretaceous
of Brazil with a Large Cranial Crest (pages 1377–1388)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12007


Xabier PEREDA-SUBERBIOLA, Fabien KNOLL, José Ignacio RUIZ-OMEÑACA,
Julio COMPANY and Fidel TORCIDA FERNÁNDEZ-BALDOR (2012)
Reassessment of Prejanopterus curvirostris, a Basal Pterodactyloid
Pterosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Spain (pages 1389–1401)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12008


W. Scott PERSONS IV and Philip J. CURRIE (2012)
Dragon Tails: Convergent Caudal Morphology in Winged Archosaurs (pages
1402–1412)
DOI: 10.1111/1755-6724.12009