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[PDF REQUEST] Re: Prognathodon (Mosasauridae) had shark-like hypocercal tail fin



Could anyone with access to the paper pass it along to me. 


Thanks,

Jason



----- Original Message -----
> From: Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com>
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Cc: 
> Sent: Tuesday, 10 September 2013 11:27 AM
> Subject: Prognathodon (Mosasauridae) had shark-like hypocercal tail fin
> 
> From: Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
> 
> 
> A new paper in Nature Communications:
> 
> 
> 
> Johan Lindgren, Hani F. Kaddumi & Michael J. Polcyn (2013)
> Soft tissue preservation in a fossil marine lizard with a bilobed tail fin.
> Nature Communications 4, Article number: 2423
> doi:10.1038/ncomms3423
> http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/130910/ncomms3423/full/ncomms3423.html
> 
> 
> 
> Mosasaurs are secondarily aquatic squamates that became the dominant
> marine reptiles in the Late Cretaceous about 98–66 million years ago.
> Although early members of the group possessed body shapes similar to
> extant monitor lizards, derived forms have traditionally been
> portrayed as long, sleek animals with broadened, yet ultimately
> tapering tails. Here we report an extraordinary mosasaur fossil from
> the Maastrichtian of Harrana in central Jordan, which preserves soft
> tissues, including high fidelity outlines of a caudal fluke and
> flippers. This specimen provides the first indisputable evidence that
> derived mosasaurs were propelled by hypocercal tail fins, a hypothesis
> that was previously based on comparative skeletal anatomy alone.
> Ecomorphological comparisons suggest that derived mosasaurs were
> similar to pelagic sharks in terms of swimming performance, a finding
> that significantly expands our understanding of the level of aquatic
> adaptation achieved by these seagoing lizards.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> News stories:
> 
> http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/09/130910-mosasaur-sea-monster-reptile-tail-ocean-science/
> 
> http://www.livescience.com/39518-marine-lizard-with-shark-tail.html
>