[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

A question for zoonomenclaturists



Hi everyone,

I got a question about zoological nomenclature. If anyone could help me out, that would be very nice !

Here is the jest:

1/ A new genus and its new type species were published a few months ago.

2/ The type and only species was expressly formed from a Latin verb in the infinitive form, to which was added the masculine/neuter genitive ending -i.

This name is not only incorrect in Latin, but it also regarding the Code. Article 11.9.1 of the Code requires indeed that “a Latin or latinized word [it] *MUST* be, or be treated as, 11.9.1.1. an adjective or participle in the nominative singular […], or 11.9.1.2. a noun in the nominative singular standing in apposition to the generic name […], or 11.9.1.3. a noun in the genitive case […], or 11.9.1.4. an adjective used as a substantive in the genitive case and derived from the specific name of an organism with which the animal in question is associated” to be considered as available.

According to this article, the species is therefore not available.

3/ Now, even if its description follows the requirements of the ICZN, is the genus name available ?

There are rules regarding the designation of a type species from the originally included ones or from the first to have been included in the genus (if the genus was erected all alone)... but I don't know what to do in this particular case.

What do you think about it ?

Cheers,
Jocelyn

--
"As a Professor of Science, I assure you we did in fact evolve from filthy monkey men." Hubert J. Farnworth.