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Re: Triassic pterosaur found in Argentina + Amphicoelias vertebra replica + other news



That just goes to show how useless taxonomy can be. There's no such thing as a 
'fish', after all. :-)

Compound the limitations of taxonomy with the fuzzy definition of 'species', 
and the whole thing 
becomes an exercise in futility. You might as well be pulling random numbers 
from a hat.

Dinosaurs have always been considered 'reptiles', so if you accept that birds 
are theropods then it 
stands to reason that birds are also 'reptiles'. Not that 'taxonomy' and 
'reason' are always close 
bedfellows.


On Mon, Aug 4th, 2014 at 11:38 AM, Jura <pristichampsus@yahoo.com> wrote:

> For the same reasons that they were always considered reptiles while birds 
> weren't. 
> 
> Remember this is taxonomy, not phylogenetics.
> 
> Jason

> From: Dann Pigdon <dannj@alphalink.com.au>
> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
> Cc: 
> Sent: Sunday, August 3, 2014 7:43 PM
> Subject: Re: Triassic pterosaur found in Argentina + Amphicoelias vertebra 
> replica + other news
> 
> On Sun, Aug 3rd, 2014 at 2:20 AM, Jura <pristichampsus@yahoo.com> wrote:
> 
> > According to IOC World Bird List (http://www.worldbirdnames.org/) there are 
> > 10,534 extant 
bird
> > species recognized. So birds still beat out reptiles (10,038 recognized 
> > species), if just by a
> > few hundred. It will be interesting to see where things stand in the next 
> > few years.
> 
> How can crocs be considered 'reptiles' while birds aren't? Surely either all 
> archosaurs are
> 'reptiles', or none of them are.

-- 
_____________________________________________________________

Dann Pigdon
Spatial Data Analyst               Australian Dinosaurs
Melbourne, Australia               http://home.alphalink.com.au/~dannj
_____________________________________________________________