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Re: Triassic vertebrates from Greenland (free pdf)



Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

A problem with the url I didn't catch. I hit send too soon. Sorry.
Here's the corrected link:

Tomasz  Sulej,, Andrzej Wolniewicz, Niels Bonde,  Błażej Błażejowski,
Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki & Mateusz Tałanda (2014)
New perspectives on the Late Triassic vertebrates of East Greenland:
preliminary results of a Polish-Danish palaeontological expedition.
Polish Polar Research 35 (4): 541–552
DOI: 10.2478,popore-2014-0030
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/popore.2014.35.issue-4/popore-2014-0030/popore-2014-0030.xml?format=INT

On Tue, Dec 30, 2014 at 8:52 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
>
> A new paper not yet mentioned, in open access:
>
> Tomasz  Sulej,, Andrzej Wolniewicz, Niels Bonde,  Błażej Błażejowski,
> Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki & Mateusz Tałanda (2014)
> New perspectives on the Late Triassic vertebrates of East Greenland:
> preliminary results of a Polish-Danish palaeontological expedition.
> Polish Polar Research 35 (4): 541–552
> DOI: 10.2478,popore-2014-0030
> http:,,www.degruyter.com,view,j,popore.2014.35.issue-4,popore-2014-0030,popore-2014-0030.xml?format=INT
>
> The Fleming Fjord Formation (Jameson Land, East Greenland) documents a
> diverse assemblage of terrestrial vertebrates of Late Triassic age.
> Expeditions from the turn of the 21st century have discovered many
> important fossils that form the basis of our current knowledge of Late
> Triassic Greenlandic faunas. However, due to the scarcity and
> incompleteness of the fossils and their insufficient study, our
> understanding of the taxonomic diversity of the Fleming Fjord
> Formation is hindered. Here, we report the preliminary findings of a
> Polish-Danish expedition to the Fleming Fjord Formation that took
> place in 2014. Three areas were visited – the fairly well known
> MacKnight Bjerg and Wood Bjerg and the virtually unexplored
> Liasryggen. MacKnigth Bjerg and Liasryggen yielded fossils which
> promise to significantly broaden our knowledge of vertebrate evolution
> in the Late Triassic. Stem-mammal remains were discovered at
> Liasryggen. Other fossils found at both sites include remains of
> actinopterygians, sarcopterygians, temnospondyl amphibians and various
> archosaurs (including early dinosaurs). Numerous vertebrate trace
> fossils, including coprolites, pseudosuchian footprints, theropod and
> sauropodomorph dinosaur tracks, were also discovered. Newly discovered
> skeletal remains as well as abundant trace fossils indicate higher
> tetrapod diversity in the Late Triassic of Greenland than previously
> thought. Trace fossils also allow inferences of early theropod and
> sauropodomorph dinosaur behaviour.