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Re: Kulindadromeus, basal ornithischian from Siberia with both feathers and scales



Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


Reading the paper and the supplementary material, there appears to be
no mention of remains of Compsognathus, which was widely reported in
early news stories in Russian and in English.


http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/news/an-amazing-collection-of-dinosaur-remains-found-in-volcanic-ash-in-siberia/

**

http://dml.cmnh.org/2013Jul/msg00182.html

**

http://dml.cmnh.org/2013Jul/msg00294.html

****
>From supplementary material for Godefroit, et al, 2014:

Both bonebeds are here regarded as monospecific: comparisons of the
different skeletal elements within and between the two bonebeds do not
provide any indication that more than one basal ornithischian is
represented in the Ukureyskaya Formation of the Kulinda locality. Each
individual skeletal element is represented by a single morphotype and
all the observed differences can easily be explained by ontogenetic
and normal intraspecific variations, as confirmed by the detailed
study of the partly articulated skeletons. Besides the basal
ornithischian remains, a single shed tooth from a medium-sized
theropod was found in bonebed 3.

===
I take it the supposed "Compsognathus" remains were in fact
Kulindadromeus as well.


On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:21 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
> From the Supplementary Material (downloadable for free);
>
>
> Based on comparisons of the paleoentomological and the microfaunal
> contents with the Glushkovo Formation in the Unda-Daya Depression, the
> Ukureyskaya Formation has been dated as Late Jurassic – Early
> Cretaceous (29, 30). However, recent K-Ar dating suggests a slightly
> older age: the entire Ukureyskaya Formation ranges between 169 and 144
> Ma (29), corresponding to a Bajocian-Tithonian age (Middle to Late
> Jurassic) (31).
>
>
> It's a pretty wide span of time....
>
> ********
> Also, additional videos:
>
> First video (in English)
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpoLtynCRU0&list=PL-ZCpJWRnAyVIpCNXd9c6remg--yJP-bh&index=6
>
>
> 4 videos in French (posted last week it appears)
>
> https://www.youtube.com/user/Naturalsciences/videos
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:01 PM, Will Baird <anzhalyu@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Is the geochronology of the specimen better constrained than middle/late
>> jurassic?
>>
>> I was looking at the paper and didnt see anything other than that, but
>> perhaps I'm blind?
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:57 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Ben Creisler
>>> bcreisler@gmail.com
>>>
>>> Some additional material about the find:
>>>
>>> Video interviews with Pascal Godefroit:
>>>
>>>
>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgWtD0qcydU
>>>
>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlE4rz6Pil8
>>>
>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpX6lSC7Abw
>>>
>>> ***
>>>
>>> News and blog items:
>>>
>>>
>>> http://www.theguardian.com/science/lost-worlds/2014/jul/24/kulindadromeus-feathers-dinosaur-birds-evolution-siberia-russia
>>>
>>> http://archosaurmusings.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/kulindadromeus-images/
>>>
>>>
>>> http://news.sciencemag.org/evolution/2014/07/earliest-dinosaurs-may-have-sported-feathers
>>>
>>>
>>> http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/newly-discovered-fossils-hint-all-dinosaurs-had-feathers
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:17 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>> > Ben Creisler
>>> > bcreisler@gmail.com
>>> >
>>> > Here's the much anticipated official paper about the "feathered"
>>> > ornithischian Kulindadromeus from Siberia. The supplemental material
>>> > is free. The nomenclatural issues will be a headache after the Russian
>>> > paper a few weeks ago...
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > Pascal Godefroit, Sofia M. Sinitsa, Danielle Dhouailly, Yuri L.
>>> > Bolotsky, Alexander V. Sizov, Maria E. McNamara, Michael J. Benton &
>>> > Paul Spagna (2014)
>>> > A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and
>>> > scales.
>>> > Science 345( 6195): 451-455
>>> > DOI: 10.1126/science.1253351
>>> > http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6195/451
>>> >
>>> > Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China
>>> > have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous
>>> > integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian
>>> > dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the
>>> > evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we
>>> > describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of
>>> > Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger
>>> > imbricated scales around the tail, monofilaments around the head and
>>> > the thorax, and more complex featherlike structures around the
>>> > humerus, the femur, and the tibia. The discovery of these branched
>>> > integumentary structures outside theropods suggests that featherlike
>>> > structures coexisted with scales and were potentially widespread among
>>> > the entire dinosaur clade; feathers may thus have been present in the
>>> > earliest dinosaurs.
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > News story:
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140724-feathered-siberia-dinosaur-scales-science/
>>
>>