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Re: Kulindadromeus, basal ornithischian from Siberia with both feathers and scales



Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


The pdf of the new paper is now available for free at:

http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/benton/reprints/


http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/Benton/reprints/2014Kulinda.pdf

On Fri, Jul 25, 2014 at 1:36 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
>
> Reading the paper and the supplementary material, there appears to be
> no mention of remains of Compsognathus, which was widely reported in
> early news stories in Russian and in English.
>
>
> http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/news/an-amazing-collection-of-dinosaur-remains-found-in-volcanic-ash-in-siberia/
>
> **
>
> http://dml.cmnh.org/2013Jul/msg00182.html
>
> **
>
> http://dml.cmnh.org/2013Jul/msg00294.html
>
> ****
> From supplementary material for Godefroit, et al, 2014:
>
> Both bonebeds are here regarded as monospecific: comparisons of the
> different skeletal elements within and between the two bonebeds do not
> provide any indication that more than one basal ornithischian is
> represented in the Ukureyskaya Formation of the Kulinda locality. Each
> individual skeletal element is represented by a single morphotype and
> all the observed differences can easily be explained by ontogenetic
> and normal intraspecific variations, as confirmed by the detailed
> study of the partly articulated skeletons. Besides the basal
> ornithischian remains, a single shed tooth from a medium-sized
> theropod was found in bonebed 3.
>
> ===
> I take it the supposed "Compsognathus" remains were in fact
> Kulindadromeus as well.
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:21 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Ben Creisler
>> bcreisler@gmail.com
>>
>> From the Supplementary Material (downloadable for free);
>>
>>
>> Based on comparisons of the paleoentomological and the microfaunal
>> contents with the Glushkovo Formation in the Unda-Daya Depression, the
>> Ukureyskaya Formation has been dated as Late Jurassic – Early
>> Cretaceous (29, 30). However, recent K-Ar dating suggests a slightly
>> older age: the entire Ukureyskaya Formation ranges between 169 and 144
>> Ma (29), corresponding to a Bajocian-Tithonian age (Middle to Late
>> Jurassic) (31).
>>
>>
>> It's a pretty wide span of time....
>>
>> ********
>> Also, additional videos:
>>
>> First video (in English)
>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpoLtynCRU0&list=PL-ZCpJWRnAyVIpCNXd9c6remg--yJP-bh&index=6
>>
>>
>> 4 videos in French (posted last week it appears)
>>
>> https://www.youtube.com/user/Naturalsciences/videos
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 12:01 PM, Will Baird <anzhalyu@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Is the geochronology of the specimen better constrained than middle/late
>>> jurassic?
>>>
>>> I was looking at the paper and didnt see anything other than that, but
>>> perhaps I'm blind?
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:57 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Ben Creisler
>>>> bcreisler@gmail.com
>>>>
>>>> Some additional material about the find:
>>>>
>>>> Video interviews with Pascal Godefroit:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgWtD0qcydU
>>>>
>>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlE4rz6Pil8
>>>>
>>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpX6lSC7Abw
>>>>
>>>> ***
>>>>
>>>> News and blog items:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> http://www.theguardian.com/science/lost-worlds/2014/jul/24/kulindadromeus-feathers-dinosaur-birds-evolution-siberia-russia
>>>>
>>>> http://archosaurmusings.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/kulindadromeus-images/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> http://news.sciencemag.org/evolution/2014/07/earliest-dinosaurs-may-have-sported-feathers
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/newly-discovered-fossils-hint-all-dinosaurs-had-feathers
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Jul 24, 2014 at 11:17 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>> > Ben Creisler
>>>> > bcreisler@gmail.com
>>>> >
>>>> > Here's the much anticipated official paper about the "feathered"
>>>> > ornithischian Kulindadromeus from Siberia. The supplemental material
>>>> > is free. The nomenclatural issues will be a headache after the Russian
>>>> > paper a few weeks ago...
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > Pascal Godefroit, Sofia M. Sinitsa, Danielle Dhouailly, Yuri L.
>>>> > Bolotsky, Alexander V. Sizov, Maria E. McNamara, Michael J. Benton &
>>>> > Paul Spagna (2014)
>>>> > A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and
>>>> > scales.
>>>> > Science 345( 6195): 451-455
>>>> > DOI: 10.1126/science.1253351
>>>> > http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6195/451
>>>> >
>>>> > Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China
>>>> > have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous
>>>> > integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian
>>>> > dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the
>>>> > evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we
>>>> > describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of
>>>> > Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger
>>>> > imbricated scales around the tail, monofilaments around the head and
>>>> > the thorax, and more complex featherlike structures around the
>>>> > humerus, the femur, and the tibia. The discovery of these branched
>>>> > integumentary structures outside theropods suggests that featherlike
>>>> > structures coexisted with scales and were potentially widespread among
>>>> > the entire dinosaur clade; feathers may thus have been present in the
>>>> > earliest dinosaurs.
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > News story:
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140724-feathered-siberia-dinosaur-scales-science/
>>>
>>>