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Re: Maroccosuchus zennaroi - new tomistomine crocodile from Morocco



From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

For people who couldn't read the text of the message in plain text:

Stéphane Jouve, Baâdi Bouyac, Mbarek Amaghzazc & Saïd Meslouh. 2014.
Maroccosuchus zennaroi (Crocodylia: Tomistominae) from the Eocene of
Morocco: phylogenetic and palaeobiogeographical implications of the
basalmost tomistomine.
Journal of Systematic Palaeontology
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/suppl/10.1080/14772019.2014.913078

Abstract:

Maroccosuchus zennaroi Jonet & Wouters, 1977 from the Ypresian of the
Oulad Abdoun Basin (Morocco) is described in detail based on numerous
and well-preserved specimens. A phylogenetic analysis including 64
ingroup taxa and 238 characters reveals that M. zennaroi is the
basalmost tomistomine. This clade is supported by 10 unambiguous
synapomorphies, while only two – both related to the snout shape and
observed in gavialoids – support a closer relationship between
Kentisuchus spenceri and later tomistomines. Their absence in M.
zennaroi could reflect its intermediate morphology between basal
crocodyloids and longirostrine tomistomines. This clearly indicates a
Lower Eocene, and no older than Late Palaeocene age for the
tomistomine emergence, questioning the Late Eocene, Oligocene and
Miocene ages proposed for Gavialis–Tomistoma divergence by molecular
analyses. Considering this analysis, the biogeographical history of
the tomistomines is evaluated. This history begins in western Tethys
during the Lower Eocene or latest Palaeocene, with M. zennaroi
followed by several West European tomistomines. The Tethys becomes the
centre of dispersal to North America, Africa and Asia. The
phylogenetic analysis also suggests at least two independent
dispersals from the Tethyan area to Asia, with the extant Tomistoma
schlegelii more closely related to European Miocene forms in the first
instance, and Toyotamaphimeya machikanense and Penghusuchus pani more
closely related to the North American Thecachampsa in the second
instance. However, the small number of remains from the Oligocene and
Late Eocene does not allow a clear date of divergence and dispersal
routes to be ascertained.

On Fri, May 30, 2014 at 10:06 AM, Łukasz Czepiński
<lukaszczepinski@gmail.com> wrote:
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