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Re: A trivial question



From: Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

The person honored with the most dinosaur species names appears to be
the famous Chinese paleontologist Yang Zhongjian (1897-1979), known as
C.C. (Chung Chien) Young. My count for now is:


Chaoyangsaurus youngi Zhao, Cheng & Xu, 1999

Fulengia youngi Carroll & Galton, 1977

Mamenchisaurus youngi Pi, Ouyang & Ye, 1996

Psittacosaurus youngi Chao, 1962

Sinornithoides youngi  Russell & Dong, 1994

Tianzhenosaurus youngi Pang & Cheng, 1998

Yimenosaurus youngi Zhang, 1993

Yunnanosaurus youngi Lu, Li, Zhong, Azuma, Fujita, Dong & Ji, 2007


===

The species named "browni" honor a number of different people (Fred
Brown, Barnum Brown, Alfred Brown) so they shouldn't be counted
together.

On Sat, May 31, 2014 at 3:18 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> From: Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
>
> Thanks to Mickey for adding Gobivenator mongoliensis--should have
> caught that one.
>
> **
> Note that *ajax* was also used for Pachysauriscus ajax (Kuhn, 1959)
> [originally Pachysaurus ajax von Huene, 1907], now generally as
> Plateosaurus (with type species name to be changed).
>
> Also, for *rex*:
>
> Aliwalia rex Galton, 1985  [Eucnemesaurus]
>
> Edmarka rex Bakker et al., 1992 [Torvosaurus]
>
> Othnielia rex (Galton,1977) [from Nanosaurus rex Marsh ]
>
> Tyrannosaurus rex Osborn, 1905
>
> **
> Responding to the mongoliense issue:
>
> Protiguanodon mongoliense was a grammatical error (names in Greek
> -odon "tooth" are masculine, not neuter) so Protiguanodon mongoliensis
> was the correct form that should have been used.
>
> http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/12344149#page/178/mode/1up
>
> In Latin the masculine and feminine adjectival forms in this case are
> -ensis, and the neuter form is -ense.  See:
>
> http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-ensis
>
> Changing grammatical endings on adjectives is required to make a
> species match the Latin gender of the genus it is assigned to. I think
> "mongoliensis" and "mongoliense" should count as the same name in a
> tally of dinosaur species in this case.
>
> **
>
> Osborn (or the editor) made the same mistake with Prodeinodon
> mongoliense instead of mongoliensis-- although the correct masculine
> spelling is used in the illustration caption!
>
> http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/12344311#page/340/mode/1up
>
> **
> What is really confusing here is that Osborn is proposing a new
> genus/species "Protiguanodon mongoliense" but concedes that, after
> more preparation of the specimens, Protiguanodon may turn out to be
> the same as Psittacosaurus--and presumably belong to the species
> Psittacosaurus mongoliensis.  If Protiguanodon was the same as the
> genus Psittacosaurus (as it turned out to be) but a new species, it
> would need a new species name because of identical spellings.
>
>
> **
>
>
> I'm wondering if it was some editor for the American Museum of Natural
> History who got the Latin grammar mixed up. In the article by Mook
> about Alligator sinensis (masculine gender) in the same volume, the
> species is spelled "sinense" (neuter) throughout even though Alligator
> mississippiensis is spelled correctly!
>
>
> http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/12344145#page/185/mode/1up
>
> **
>
> R.C. Andrews et al. 1926-1930. Central Asiatic Expeditions of the
> American Museum of Natural History, under the leadership of Roy
> Chapman Andrews : preliminary contributions in geology, palaeontology,
> and zoology.
> New York : American Museum of Natural History
>
> http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/12034#/details
>
> On Fri, May 30, 2014 at 11:27 PM, Mickey Mortimer
> <mickey_mortimer111@msn.com> wrote:
>> There's also Gobivenator mongoliensis Tsuihiji, Barsbold,
>> Watabe, Tsogtbaatar, Chinzorig, Fugiyama and Suzuki, 2014
>>
>> Mickey Mortimer
>>
>> ----------------------------------------
>>> Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 21:12:03 -0700
>>> From: jayp.nair@yahoo.com
>>> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>>> Subject: Re: A trivial question
>>>
>>> 1. One less for 'mongoliensis'- Protiguanodon was named P. mongoliense 
>>> originally (not P. 'mongoliensis')
>>>
>>> 2. Psittacosaurus neimongoliensis obviously includes 'mongoliensis' in its 
>>> species name.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>> From: Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com>
>>> To: dinosaur@usc.edu
>>> Cc:
>>> Sent: Saturday, 31 May 2014 1:37 PM
>>> Subject: Re: A trivial question
>>>
>>> From: Ben Creisler
>>> bcreisler@gmail.com
>>>
>>> According to a very quick and dirty check, the most common dinosaur
>>> species name is "mongoliensis":
>>>
>>> Adasaurus mongoliensis Barsbold, 1983
>>>
>>> Asiatosaurus mongoliensis Osborn, 1924
>>>
>>> Enigmosaurus mongoliensis Barsbold & Perle, 1893
>>>
>>> Gilmoreosaurus mongoliensis (Gilmore, 1933) [Mandschurosaurus
>>> mongoliensis Gilmore, 1933]
>>>
>>> Graciliceratops mongoliensis Sereno, 2000
>>>
>>> Nemegtosaurus mongoliensis Nowinski, 1971
>>>
>>> Oviraptor mongoliensis Barsbold, 1986
>>>
>>> Prodeinodon mongoliensis Osborn, 1924
>>>
>>> Protiguanodon mongoliensis Osborn, 1923
>>>
>>> Psittacosaurus mongoliensis Osborn, 1923
>>>
>>> Saurornithoides mongoliensis Osborn, 1924
>>>
>>> Velociraptor mongoliensis Osborn, 1924
>>>
>>> ==
>>>
>>> + (if considered an honorary theropod)
>>>
>>> Brodavis mongoliensis  Martin, Kurochkin & Tokaryk. 2012
>>