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Re: Basal dinosauriform and theropod dinosaurs from Late Triassic of Poland (free pdf)



Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com



The paper is now officially published and is free (for now):


Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, Stephen L. Brusatte, Tomasz Sulej and Richard
J. Butler (2014)
Basal dinosauriform and theropod dinosaurs from the mid–late Norian
(Late Triassic) of Poland: implications for Triassic dinosaur
evolution and distribution.
Palaeontology 57(6): 1121–1142
DOI: 10.1111/pala.12107
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pala.12107/abstract


On Wed, Apr 16, 2014 at 1:34 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> From: Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
> A new online paper:
>
>
> Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki, Stephen L. Brusatte, Tomasz Sulej, and Richard
> J. Butler (2014)
> Basal dinosauriform and theropod dinosaurs from the mid–late Norian
> (Late Triassic) of Poland: implications for Triassic dinosaur
> evolution and distribution.
> Palaeontology (advance online publication)
> DOI: 10.1111/pala.12107
> http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pala.12107/abstract
>
> The rise of dinosaurs during the Triassic is a widely studied
> evolutionary radiation, but there are still many unanswered questions
> about early dinosaur evolution and biogeography that are hampered by
> an unevenly sampled Late Triassic fossil record. Although very common
> in western North America and parts of South America, dinosaur (and
> more basal dinosauriform) remains are relatively rare in the Upper
> Triassic deposits of Europe, making any new discoveries critically
> important. One of the most diverse dinosauriform assemblages from
> Europe comes from the Poręba site in Poland, a recently described
> locality with exposures of the Zbąszynek Beds, which have a
> palynomorph assemblage characteristic for the mid–late Norian in the
> biostratigraphic schemes of the Germanic Basin. Using a
> synapomorphy-based approach, we evaluate several isolated
> dinosauriform specimens from Poręba. This assemblage includes a
> silesaurid, a herrerasaurid and remains of another type of theropod
> (potentially a neotheropod). The Poręba herrerasaurid is the first
> record of this rare group of primitive dinosaurs from Europe and one
> of the youngest records worldwide, whereas the silesaurid is the
> youngest record of a silesaurid from Europe. These findings indicate
> that silesaurids persisted alongside true dinosaurs into the mid–late
> Norian of Europe and that silesaurid–herrerasaurid–neotheropod
> assemblages (which are also known from the Norian of North America, at
> low latitudes) were more widespread geographically and latitudinally
> than previously thought. Silesaurid–herrerasaurid–neotheropod
> assemblages may have been a common ecological structuring of dinosaurs
> during their early evolution, and their widespread distribution may
> indicate weak palaeolatitudinal controls on early dinosaur
> biogeography during the latest Triassic.
> ==