[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: Tyrannosaurid bite marks on remains of Daspletosaurus



Also - "Tyrannosaur turned to cannibalism, scientists say"
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/dinosaurs/11525296/Tyrannosaur-turned-to-cannibalism-scientists-say.html

Tyrannosaur had no choice but to turn to cannibalism, having crashed
in the Andes, etc.  :-)

One of the BBC articles had Luis Rey's illustration.

Mary

On Thu, Apr 9, 2015 at 11:07 AM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
>
> A new open-access paper in PeerJ:
>
> D.W.E. Hone & D. Tanke (2015)
> Pre- and postmortem tyrannosaurid bite marks on the remains of
> Daspletosaurus (Tyrannosaurinae: Theropoda) from Dinosaur Provincial
> Park, Alberta, Canada.
> PeerJ 3:e885
> doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.885
> https://peerj.com/articles/885/
>
>
>
> Trace marks on the bones of non-avian dinosaurs may relate to feeding
> by large carnivores or as a result of combat. Here the cranium and
> mandible of a specimen of Daspletosaurus are described that show
> numerous premortem injuries with evidence of healing and these are
> inferred to relate primarily to intraspecific combat. In addition,
> postmortem damage to the mandible is indicative of late stage carcass
> consumption and the taphonomic context suggests that this was
> scavenging. These postmortem bites were delivered by a large bodied
> tyrannosaurid theropod and may have been a second Daspletosaurus, and
> thus this would be an additional record of tyrannosaurid cannibalism.
--