[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: Date of T. rex discovery



Yes, all these specimens would be later after 1905 recognized as Tyrannosajurus 
rex, but at the time they were discovered what they were could not determined 
other than that of large carnivorous dinosaurs.
Osborn provided the genus names Tyrannosaurus, Albertosaurus & Dynamosaurus in 
1905.
---Manospondylus gigas [ AMNH: 3892 ] named by Cope in 1892, but was originally 
considered an "agathaumid" dinosaur, It was only later in 1917 that 
Manospondylus was determined by H F Osborn to be a theropod closely related to 
Tyrannosaurus rex but not formerly synonymized.
---Dynamosaurus imperiosus [ AMNH 5866 ] discovered in 1900, Wyoming, named by 
Osborn in 1905, recognized as Tyrannosaurus rex in 1906 after finally 
preparation and examination was completed. Synonymized as T-rex because 
Osborn's 1905 T-rex paper came first.
---Ornithomimus grandis [Metatarsal III, no catalog number], discovered by John 
Bell Hatcher, near foot of the bluffs on the south banks of the Missouri River, 
opposite Cow Island, Fergus County, Montana, named by Marsh in 1890, identified 
as a tyrannosaur by Huene in 1932.

The type material for Tyrannosaurus rex (discovered in 1902) was still being 
excavated in 1905 after the beast had been formerly named.

It was a partial skeleton with a complete series of neck vertebrae [ AMNH 5027 
], discovered and excavated in 1908 by Barnum Brown in Montana, that can be 
technically considered the first fossil discovered and identified "IN THE 
FIELD" as a Tyrannosaurus rex specimen. 

---- tholtz <tholtz@geology.umd.edu> wrote: 
> Keep in mind, AMNH 5866 (the type of Dynamosaurus imperiosus, but placed 
> in T. rex in the very second paper to discuss it) was found in 1900. 
> Thus, it is the oldest discovered standard T. rex discovery.
> 
> And some of the Marsh/Hatcher "Ornithomimus grandis" material and Cope's 
> "Manospondylus gigas" material (almost certainly T. rex) was found in 
> the 1890s.
> 
> 
> On 2015-04-19 17:10, john-schneiderman@cox.net wrote:
> > When was the material { NMC 9380; formerly AMNH 973 ) which would
> > become "Tyrannosaurus rex" discovered?
> > 
> > Discovered and collected by Barnum Brown, 1902, 1905; at Fort Peck,
> > Dawson County, Montana. reposited in the AMNH.
> > Named Tyrannosaurus rex by H F Osborn, 1905
> > 
> > 
> > ---- Poekilopleuron <dinosaurtom2015@seznam.cz> wrote:
> >> Good day,
> >> 
> >> 
> >> 
> >> I would like to ask what is the first date of _Tyrannosaurus rex_ 
> >> discovery?
> >> I know that the first unrecognized remains were found already in 1874, 
> >> but
> >> the first scientifically recognized specimen was Barnum Brown's 
> >> individual
> >> from eastern Montana. Many sources give a date of 12th August 1902 as 
> >> the
> >> day of its discovery, but Jack Horner in his book "Dinosaurs under the 
> >> Big
> >> Sky" repeatedly uses the year 1903. So what is the true date (I guess 
> >> it is
> >> 1902, but Horner is a respectable authority, esp. when it comes to T. 
> >> rex).
> >> Thank you, Tom
> 
> -- 
> Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> Email: tholtz@umd.edu   Phone: 301-405-4084
> Geology Office: Geology 4106
> Scholars Office: Centreville 1216
> Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
> Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
> http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
> Fax: 301-314-9661
> 
> Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
> http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
> Fax: 301-314-9843
> 
> Mailing Address:        Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
>                          Department of Geology
>                          Building 237, Room 1117
>                          University of Maryland
>                          College Park, MD 20742 USA