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Re: Greatest dangers in the Hell Creek environment



It's disease. It's always disease. Microbes in the Hell Creek system
would have been so different from modern ones that we would have no
immunity to them. Granted, there's the chance that they wouldn't be
able to attack us at all, given none would be geared for human
physiological or cellular machinery; however, our microbiomes are
fragile systems that are partially dependent on our environment. If
disease didn't kill us, the shock to our systems from breathing
different air with different microbes, and eating and drinking food
with different microbes would.

"Stupid disease, always hijacking history" ~ John Green

On Mon, Dec 7, 2015 at 3:28 PM, Dann Pigdon <dannj@alphalink.com.au> wrote:
>
>
> Microorganisms have always been (and will always be) the undisputed rulers of 
> this planet. They
> have a more profound effect on life than anything else. All things live or 
> die at their whim.
>
> I for one welcome our microorganic overlords.
>
>
> On Mon, Dec 7th, 2015 at 10:28 PM, Poekilopleuron <dinosaurtom2015@seznam.cz> 
> wrote:
>
>> Good day!
>>
>> I would like to ask, which would be most dangerous for a human (say, time
>> traveler) in the end-Cretaceous world:
>>
>> 1. Large and mid-sized theropods (Tyrannosaurus, Dakotaraptor)
>>
>> 2. Smaller theropods (Acheroraptor, Anzu...)
>>
>> 3. Large herbivorous dinosaurs; e. g. protecting nests (Triceratops,
>> Ankylosaurus, Edmontosaurus...)
>>
>> 4. Non-dinosaurian vertebrates (crocodiles, pterosaurs, sharks, mammals)
>>
>> 5. Invertebrate parasites (both ecto- and endo-, like ticks)
>>
>> 6. Microoorganisms (Trichomonas? Viruses, bacterial patogenes, etc.)
>>
>> 7. Environmental effects (volcanic activity, poisonous gases, earthquakes,
>> floods)
>>
>> 8. Well, of course...rare, but devastating large impacts.
>>
>> Thank you in advance, Tom
>
> --
> _____________________________________________________________
>
> Dann Pigdon
> Spatial Data Analyst               Australian Dinosaurs
> Melbourne, Australia               http://home.alphalink.com.au/~dannj
> _____________________________________________________________
>



-- 
Margaret Dickson
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department of Biological Sciences
Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology
PhD Candidate