[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: Perhaps the most unusual paper I've ever been a part of



Eating and handling prohibitions are widespread among many religious and/or ethnic groups so these issues go beyond the topic of one paper on kosher and non-kosher.

Dan

On 9/25/2015 12:12 PM, Allan Edels wrote:
You would probably need to use different tools on the kosher specimens (much like using different utensils and plates and bowls for meat vs. milk, or Passover vs. non-Passover [also broken down between meat vs. milk] - vs. the non-kosher specimens.

E.g. Kosher picks, brushes, hammers, shovels - separate from the non-kosher ones. Larger items, such as a jackhammer could possibly have different hammer tips....

And, obviously, you would need to store the specimens in separate cabinets, etc.

:-)

Allan Edels

(Mickey/Mary: I included you on this list, because most of my posts directly to the DML in the past few years have not posted, and needed re-posting. So you guys are just in case).

> Date: Fri, 25 Sep 2015 11:15:33 -0600
> From: danchure@easilink.com
> To: clastic@verizon.net; tholtz@geology.umd.edu; dinosaur@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Perhaps the most unusual paper I've ever been a part of
>
> Are there previously unrecognized issues of collecting, preparing,
> curating, and storing kosher and non-kosher specimens?
>
> Dan
>
> On 9/25/2015 11:09 AM, clastic@verizon.net wrote:
> > Or members of other sects would be reduced to only handling serpent remains, perhaps?
> >
> > Clair Russell Ossian, PhD
> > Professor of Geology, Emeritus
> > Tarrant County College
> > 2805 Raintree Drive
> > Carrollton, Texas 75006
> >
> > On 09/25/15, Dan Chure<danchure@easilink.com> wrote:
> >
> > Is one of the implications that some people should not study non-kosher
> > extinct clades?
> >
> > Dan
> >
> > D
> >
> > On 9/24/2015 5:01 PM, tholtz wrote:
> >> http://www.evolution-outreach.com/content/8/1/17
> >>
> >> Plotnick, R.E., J.M. Theodor & Thomas R. Holtz. 2015. Jurassic Pork:
> >> What Could a Jewish Time Traveler Eat? volution: Education and
> >> Outreach 2015, 8:17 doi:10.1186/s12052-015-0047-2
> >>
> >> Abstract
> >> Paleontologists use multiple methods to reconstruct the anatomy and
> >> behavior of extinct animals, including direct observations from
> >> well-preserved fossils and inferences from the phylogeny of modern and
> >> extinct relatives. We illustrate these techniques by reference to the
> >> biblical definitions of kosher and non-kosher animals; that is, how
> >> can we apply these approaches to the hypothetical question of whether
> >> an extinct form would have been kosher. The biblical categories do not
> >> readily map to modern understandings of systematics, but are heavily
> >> based on life mode. When given, distinguishing characteristics, such
> >> as the presence of fins and scales in aquatic animals, can be readily
> >> seen directly in fossils. In other cases, such as cud chewing, they
> >> need to be inferred from the phylogenetic relationships of the fossil
> >> forms. Dinosaurs (other than birds), unfortunately, are not kosher. A
> >> kosher “paleo diet” would be increasingly difficult further in the
> >> past. The use of biblical content as a way of introducing concepts
> >> from paleontology and evolutionary biology, such as crown groups and
> >> stem groups, should be of broad interest.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>
>