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[dinosaur] Willinakaqe, hadrosaurid from Cretaceous of Argentina re-evaluated




Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


A paper originally published in advance online some months back, recently officially published. There is no abstract, so I've included the "conclusion" from the paper.

Penélope Cruzado-Caballero and Rodolfo A. Coria (2016)
Revisiting the hadrosaurid (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) diversity of the Allen Formation: a re-evaluation of Willinakaqe salitralensis from Salitral Moreno, Río Negro Province, Argentina. 
Ameghiniana 53: 231–237
doi:  http: // dx.doi.org/10.5710/AMGH.25.09.2015.2943


http: // www.ameghiniana.org.ar/index.php/ameghiniana/article/view/231-237


https: // www.academia.edu/24136476/REVISITING_THE_HADROSAURID_DINOSAURIA_ORNITHOPODA_DIVERSITY_OF_THE_ALLEN_FORMATION_A_RE-EVALUATION_OF_WILLINAKAQE_SALITRALENSIS_FROM_SALITRAL_MORENO_R%C3%8DO_NEGRO_PROVINCE_ARGENTINA



CONCLUSIONS

Willinakaqe salitralensis was based upon remains collected in an extensively outcropping formation and from several strata within it. The specimens belong to individuals of different ontogenetic stages and include two different morphotypes. Also, the holotype specimen is very incomplete and too weathered to support a strong diagnosis.

The immature nature of that individual could also lead to misidentification of unique features that could be modified throughout the ontogeny. The differences found in the dentaries (number of tooth positions, width of the tooth positions, and position and angle between the tooth row and the coronoid process), humeri (orientation and dimensions of the deltopectoral crest and development of bicipital groove) and metatarsals (length/width proportions) indicate differences of taxonomic significance among the specimens assigned to W. salitralensis. In addition, the invalidity of all characters of the original diagnosis, lead us to consider Willinakaqe salitralensis as nomina vanum.

The hadrosaurids from the Allen Formation in the area of Río Negro Province likely include at least one taxon different from any other recorded hadrosaurid. Nonetheless, such taxonomic identification requires a more rigorous osteological analysis of all available evidence.