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Re: Oryctodromeus (Cretaceous ornithopod) forelimb musculature reconstruction and digging ability



I guess I do need to put  spaces before and after the double-slash to
prevent the url rewrite. Here's a cleaned up version.



Jamie L. Fearon & David J. Varricchio (2016)
Reconstruction of the forelimb musculature of the Cretaceous
ornithopod dinosaur Oryctodromeus Cubicularis: implications for
digging.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (advance online publication)
DOI:10.1080/02724634.2016.1078341
http: // www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02724634.2016.1078341

On Sat, Feb 6, 2016 at 10:23 PM, Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
> Ben Creisler
> bcreisler@gmail.com
>
>
> A new paper:
>
> Jamie L. Fearon & David J. Varricchio (2016)
> Reconstruction of the forelimb musculature of the Cretaceous
> ornithopod dinosaur Oryctodromeus Cubicularis: implications for
> digging.
> Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (advance online publication)
> DOI:10.1080/02724634.2016.1078341
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__&d=CwIBaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=x82f3Wlkwtmbr1z8IAt9jA&m=o118QXxaK4TCHd6n-w_OdyFKpMAZCn3wB68wj_7CRU8&s=BQhKKlqZnkzP04TvHUBpyLM187MOAPrTfhbdpSzY4vw&e=
>   www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02724634.2016.1078341
>
> Taphonomic and morphological evidence suggests that Oryctodromeus
> cubicularis, a basal ornithopod dinosaur from the mid-Cretaceous of
> Montana, constructed burrows by digging with its forelimbs.
> Reconstruction of the forelimb musculature of Oryctodromeus was
> carried out using the extant phylogenetic bracket method, with
> crocodilians and ratites as the extant analogues, aided by the
> presence of osteological correlates in Oryctodromeus and other
> ornithopods. Although reconstructions directly from the extant
> phylogenetic bracket are relatively conservative, the reconstruction
> elucidates several potential features related to burrowing. The
> prominent muscle groups used in burrowing in mammals are the
> deltoideus scapularis, teres major, latissimus dorsi, and triceps
> longus. In Oryctodromeus, the deltoideus scapularis, and equivocally
> the teres major, has broad origin on the strongly posteroventrally
> expanded distal scapular blade. Neither the origin of the deltoideus
> scapularis nor that of the teres major produces osteological
> correlates in extant taxa or Oryctodromeus; however, the ventrally
> expanded posterior scapular blade would have increased attachment area
> for the origin of these muscle groups. The presence of the latissimus
> dorsi is supported by the extant phylogenetic bracket but produces no
> osteological correlates in Oryctodromeus. The triceps longus
> originates posterior to the glenoid and inserts on the ulna. Due to
> the proximity of the triceps longus origin to the glenoid, the triceps
> longus likely did not provide strong muscle action. Because many
> mammals and reptiles produce burrows without any morphological
> specialization, the limited specializations of the deltoideus
> scapularis and potentially the teres major sufficiently support
> burrowing capabilities in Oryctodromeus.
>
> ==