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Re: [dinosaur-l] 'Tully monster' is a vertebrate



In the book "Monsters of the Sea" by Richard Ellis; Publisher Globe Pequot, 
2006.  Pages 25-27.

F.W. "Ted" Holiday claims the Loch Ness Monster is a huge black worm/slug like 
creature which he called in his book "The Great Orm of Loch Ness".
It was after a change meeting with Roy Mackal, an American molecular biologist, 
that Roy presented pictures of a long-extinct, segmented invertebrate called 
Tullimonstrum gregarium, the "common Tully monster"

John Schneiderman
john-schneiderman@cox.net


---- Alaric Shapli <alaric.sh@gmail.com> wrote: 
> 
> 
> On 3/16/2016 5:17 PM, Ronald Orenstein wrote:
> > Someone (I don't remember who) suggested that the Loch Ness Monster 
> > was a gigantic /Tullimonstrum/.  IMHO, it isn't (because it doesn't 
> > exist).
> > Ronald Orenstein
> > 1825 Shady Creek Court
> > Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> > Canada
> > ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> > ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > *From:* Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com>
> > *To:* dinosaur-l@usc.edu
> > *Sent:* Wednesday, March 16, 2016 5:10 PM
> > *Subject:* Re: [dinosaur-l] 'Tully monster' is a vertebrate
> >
> >
> > Ben Creisler
> > bcreisler@gmail.com <mailto:bcreisler@gmail.com>
> >
> > Uh-oh. It appears that usc has imposed the urldefense rewrite and 
> > redirect on the urls sent through the new DML address. I'll need to 
> > add spaces in urls again...
> >
> >
> > Some additional info:
> >
> >
> > http: // 
> > www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-tully-monster-scientists-finally-think-they-know-180958422/?no-ist
> >  
> > <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.smithsonianmag.com_science-2Dnature_what-2Dtully-2Dmonster-2Dscientists-2Dfinally-2Dthink-2Dthey-2Dknow-2D180958422_-3Fno-2Dist&d=CwMFaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=MCVXC0q_JzvNhMcgST-FcT_Zsslp_TM4RWnFjOPIsx0&s=8ko4CVZDN6SNRF8AfyPSuvgAMGUdR7UPt2SaYa8hZ0k&e=>
> >
> > http: // 
> > www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/03/solving-the-mystery-of-the-tully-monster/473823/
> >  
> > <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.theatlantic.com_science_archive_2016_03_solving-2Dthe-2Dmystery-2Dof-2Dthe-2Dtully-2Dmonster_473823_&d=CwMFaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=MCVXC0q_JzvNhMcgST-FcT_Zsslp_TM4RWnFjOPIsx0&s=RZheBU0LfRkcqp2mfeJx8gGse_Jszr82vbyEzx_pOE8&e=>
> >
> >
> > http: // 
> > news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160316-tully-monster-vertebrate-fossil-animal-paleontology-science/
> >  
> > <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__news.nationalgeographic.com_2016_03_160316-2Dtully-2Dmonster-2Dvertebrate-2Dfossil-2Danimal-2Dpaleontology-2Dscience_&d=CwMFaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=MCVXC0q_JzvNhMcgST-FcT_Zsslp_TM4RWnFjOPIsx0&s=azEkKA8JzaX1OiKdP0-UYC0oh8lPw2_KRnvwFVe7M9c&e=>
> >
> > http: // 
> > www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature16992.html 
> > <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nature.com_nature_journal_vaop_ncurrent_full_nature16992.html&d=CwMFaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=MCVXC0q_JzvNhMcgST-FcT_Zsslp_TM4RWnFjOPIsx0&s=bNJ5yglULoRulU9t5Ya9TL-odFQGhwTLFDiPuHJq6Bw&e=>
> >
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Mar 16, 2016 at 1:58 PM, Neil Taylor <nf.taylor@ntlworld.com 
> > <mailto:nf.taylor@ntlworld.com>> wrote:
> >
> >     Not dinosaurs, but...
> >
> >     
> > https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__phys.org_news_2016-2D03-2Dmysterious-2Dtully-2Dmonster-2Dvertebrate.html&d=CwIDaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=mRfGcBsaAJ0BD5KotcpRXKU-9JWqVv7WF-BjyeYfyx4&s=xMg_WvcDPILgHAo8UPPXuStbGxOkhVzE9sHRoQKwhJc&e=
> >
> >     The Tully Monster, an oddly configured sea creature with teeth at
> >     the end of a narrow, trunk-like extension of its head and eyes
> >     that perch on either side of a long, rigid bar, has finally been
> >     identified.
> >
> >     A Yale-led team of paleontologists has determined that the
> >     300-million-year-old animal—which grew to only a foot long—was a
> >     vertebrate, with gills and a stiffened rod (or notochord) that
> >     supported its body.  It is part of the same lineage as the modern
> >     lamprey."I was first intrigued by the mystery of the Tully Monster.
> >     ...
> >     More information: The Tully Monster is a vertebrate, Nature,
> >     nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature16992
> >     
> > <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__nature.com_articles_doi-3A10.1038_nature16992&d=CwMFaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=MCVXC0q_JzvNhMcgST-FcT_Zsslp_TM4RWnFjOPIsx0&s=5nixQrBZ6rhLpNJkiXybH4X_ixGvE7Qv6Ypciht7Abo&e=>
> >
> >
> >     ---
> >     This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> >     
> > https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.avast.com_antivirus&d=CwIDaQ&c=clK7kQUTWtAVEOVIgvi0NU5BOUHhpN0H8p7CSfnc_gI&r=Ry_mO4IFaUmGof_Yl9MyZgecRCKHn5g4z1CYJgFW9SI&m=mRfGcBsaAJ0BD5KotcpRXKU-9JWqVv7WF-BjyeYfyx4&s=3yefidnN4W6lVdPfARDore-yaVy_7eoxzmdxVf_8BOk&e=
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>