[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index][Subject Index][Author Index]

Re: [dinosaur] Dinosauria reclassification joins Ornithischia and Theropoda in Ornithoscelida




Just a side note. The paper can be read at this link (but not downloaded without a subscription):


http://www.readcube.com/articles/10.1038/nature21700?shared_access_token=FkX9YygxOC6Vjh5BFD6fRNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0M90DUzIj8q5jPeCtoSdpixcogPLAxxIyCleLqdu5QeIqpWQIExisqJ0gMbKQ2U8p9wJgSX17t4jOj_z5yAiO2nOBJ_G8V2Gvy4qQOUzHxbug%3D%3D

On Sat, Mar 25, 2017 at 12:03 PM, Mike Habib <biologyinmotion@gmail.com> wrote:


> On Mar 25, 2017, at 10:19 AM, David Marjanovic <david.marjanovic@gmx.at> wrote:
>
> Gesendet: Freitag, 24. März 2017 um 07:50 Uhr
> Von: "Mike Habib" <biologyinmotion@gmail.com>
>
>> it may be worth considering if the supinated forelimb anatomy in dinosaurs was mostly a side effect of the specific pathway they took for forelimb reduction.
>
> To have the forelimbs locked in a supinated position is plesiomorphic. Crocodiles have this condition, *Acanthostega* has it. It is actually hard to get rid of while staying quadrupedal. Its persistence in theropods certainly rules out certain hypotheses on what theropod forelimbs were used for before flying became fashionable, but it doesn't itself require an explanation.

That's a darn good point. Fair enough - then I suppose the pathway to reduction merely *maintained* the supinated condition, which means far less. No explanation needed, after all.

Cheers,

--Mike

Sent from my Cybernetic Symbiote