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[dinosaur] Eubrontes parallel tracks influenced by lake shore, not gregariousness? (free pdf)




Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

A recent free paper not yet mentioned:

Patrick R. Getty, Christopher Aucoin, Nathaniel Fox, Aaron Judge, Laurel Hardy and Andrew M. Bush (2017)
Perennial Lakes as an Environmental Control on Theropod Movement in the Jurassic of the Hartford Basin.
Geosciences 7(1) (advance online publication)
doi:10.3390/geosciences7010013
http://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/7/1/13


Eubrontes giganteus is a common ichnospecies of large dinosaur track in the Early Jurassic rocks of the Hartford and Deerfield basins in Connecticut and Massachusetts, USA. It has been proposed that the trackmaker was gregarious based on parallel trackways at a site in Massachusetts known as Dinosaur Footprint Reservation (DFR). The gregariousness hypothesis is not without its problems, however, since parallelism can be caused by barriers that direct animal travel. We tested the gregariousness hypothesis by examining the orientations of trackways at five sites representing permanent and ephemeral lacustrine environments. Parallelism is only prominent in permanent lacustrine rocks at DFR, where trackways show a bimodal orientation distribution that approximates the paleoshoreline. By contrast, parallel trackways are uncommon in ephemeral lacustrine facies, even at sites with large numbers of trackways, and those that do occur exhibit differences in morphology, suggesting that they were made at different times. Overall, the evidence presented herein suggests that parallelism seen in Hartford Basin Eubrontes giganteus is better explained as a response to the lake acting as a physical barrier rather than to gregariousness. Consequently, these parallel trackways should not be used as evidence to support the hypothesis that the trackmaker was a basal sauropodomorph unless other evidence can substantiate the gregariousness hypothesis. 





NOTE: This is thefirst paper for part of an open access volume "Middle Jurassic Dinosaurs in Context"

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/geosciences/special_issues/middle_jurassic_dinosaurs